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  • psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813
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    • From the Garden: Of Kales and Coleworts
      Now that we are experiencing nearly nightly frosts the kale, or coleworts as the ancients term it, are at their finest. Tuscan kale There are a number of varieties of this most useful gree,n but one in particular has garnered much attention and admiration by the modern ... Continue Reading »
    • A Thirst for History: Old Stitch Beer
      This week on the podcast, Master of Historic Foodways Frank Clark details his 20-year quest to recreate the perfect 18th-century brew. Rounded in flavor, middling in alcohol content, and deep caramel in color, his “Old Stitch” reached a perfection recognized in the United States Beer Tasting Championship’s 20th annual competition. Listen now.
    • Have you heard these Revolutionary heroes’ stories?
      Their names are sometimes footnotes in history, but many of these heroes stood shoulder to shoulder in the fight for independence with the founders of a new nation. Some of their stories are featured on the American Heroes Channel’s broadcast “The American Revolution,” which premieres Monday, Dec. 15 at 9 p.m. You can learn more about ... Continue Reading » […]
    • Shakespeare Comes to the Palace
      By Toni Guagenti For a brief time this holiday season, the grand ballroom at the Governor’s Palace will be transformed into a Shakespeare theater for the very first time. Andrea Squires, who plays Maria in “Twelfth Night,” rehearses a scene with John Cauthen as Sir Toby Belch ... Continue Reading »
    • HERO has tools to teach the American story
      By Dale Van Eck Children today are different! But not just because they mature years earlier than children did even a couple of generations ago. Not just because of the clothes they wear or don’t wear. Not just because they dye their hair and style it differently than we did when we were that age. No, ... Continue Reading »
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Garden Club of Virginia Hosts Symposium 2015 in Williamsburg

The Garden Club of Virginia is throwing a fabulous party and you’re invited! Symposium 2015 is Monday, Feb. 2-Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2014 at the Williamsburg Lodge in Colonial Williamsburg. This three-day celebration of Virginia includes short courses, excursions and lectures. Topics include gardening, floral design, landscape design, interior design, Virginia history and conservation successes.

The Garden Club of Virginia is throwing a fabulous party and you’re invited! Symposium 2015 is Monday, Feb. 2-Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2014 at the Williamsburg Lodge in Colonial Williamsburg. This three-day celebration of Virginia includes short courses, excursions and lectures. Topics include gardening, floral design, landscape design, interior design, Virginia history and conservation successes.

Ticket holders can go behind-the-scenes at Colonial Williamsburg art museums and visit a LEED-certified building at The College of William and Mary. Guided garden walks, and cooking and tasting demonstrations will take place at Taste Studio at Colonial Williamsburg.

A Virginia fashion design industry runway show will feature top commonwealth designers at an evening of fashion, food and meet-the-designer fun. At the “Photos and Flowers Cocktail Party,” Scenic Virginia photo contest-winning images will be displayed along with flower arrangements inspired by the photographs. Landscape and interior design expert James Farmer will work with the Colonial Williamsburg products team to create tablescapes for porch living.

Symposium 2015 Williamsburg’s grand finale is Snipped! — an iron-man flower arranging competition by noted American flower arrangers:

• Michael Grim, co-owner of The Bridgehampton Florist and floral consultant for Ina Garten’s Food Network show, Barefoot Contessa.

• Sybil Sylvester, owner of Wildflower Designs and photo stylist for Southern Accents and Southern Living.

• James Farmer, landscape and interior design consultant; author whose books include A Time to Plant, A Time to Cook and Porch Living; and editor-at-large for Southern Living

Live music from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s will be provided by the Smith Wade Band.

Flower arrangements will be judged by Flower Magazine Editor Margot Shaw, Colonial Williamsburg floral design Director Clark Taggart, Richmond floral guru David Pippin and Frank Robinson, GCV honorary member and president and CEO of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.

Symposium 2015 attendees will also enjoy VIP shopping opportunities in Merchants Square, the Symposium 2015 Boutique and the SCARPA designer shoe trailer, as well as lunches and cocktail parties.

Registration info here

Historic Gardening Symposium @ Bacons Castle

You are cordially invited to attend the Historic Gardening Symposium, hosted at the oldest known English formal garden in North America on Saturday, June 8th, 2013.  The Symposium will take place between 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at Bacon’s Castle in nearby Surry .Virginia.

You will enjoy presentations on 17th and 18th-century Virginian gardening practices, the archaeological discovery of the original garden, and the recent historical research that may influence the future interpretation of our 17th-century Bacon’s Castle Garden, as well as a guided tour of the garden. 

Tickets are $35 and include a boxed lunch.

 Attendance is limited to the first twenty-five registrants. Register by May 25th, 2013 and receive $10 off the ticket price.

To reserve your place, please visit Historic Gardening Symposium Registration or  contact tballance@preservation.org. with any questions.

image

Expected Itinerary:
11:00 a.m.
John Custis and the Transatlantic Plant Exchange:
Speaker, Wesley Greene, Colonial Williamsburg‘s Historic Trades Gardener
John Custis was the most active Williamsburg resident in the transatlantic plant exchange during the first half of the 18th century. This talk is based on excerpts from Custis’s 12 year correspondence with the English plant collector Peter Collinson focusing on the plants they traded and the challenges of sending plants aboard ship in the age of sail.
12:00
Lunch Break. Boxed lunch included with ticket
12:30 p.m.
Discovering the Lost Garden:
Nicholas Luccketti, Archaeologist, James River Institute for Archaeology.
In 1983, The Garden Club of Virginia had been asked to fund an archaeological study to determine the position of a 19th century garden and then help with its restoration. Unexpectedly, the study also found an 18th century garden covering a huge rectangular 17th century garden, making this garden the oldest English Formal Garden in North America. We are honored to have Nicholas Luccketti, lead archaeologist on this project return to speak about the significance of this dig.
1:30 p.m.
Arthur Allen II’s Pleasure Garden:
Will Rieley, RLA and Margaret Bemiss, Author of Historic Virginia Gardens, both representing the Garden Club of Virginia
The 1660s saw the beginning of the development of the public “pleasure garden”, which grew to become the center of English social life for the next 200 years. This talk discusses the new research that shows Bacon’s Castle’s Garden results from young Allen II’s education in England. Classical proportion were well-known in England in the late 17th century and the garden at Bacon’s Castle was intentionally laid out to be a grand garden, as befitted a man of his station and the grand house it was to complement.
2:30
Tour the Garden with Bacon’s Castle’s Head Gardner, Valerie Balentine.

Want to go ?

Saturday, June 8th, 2013

11:00am-2:30pm

Location

Bacon’s Castle

465 Bacon’s Castle Trail, Surry, VA 23883

Contact

baconscastle@preservationvirginia.org

757-357-5976

80th Anniversary of Historic Garden Week in Virginia April 20-27, 2013

“Virginia is especially beautiful during Historic Garden Week,” explains Lynn McCashin, Executive Director of the Garden Club of Virginia, the sponsoring organization of this statewide house and garden tour. “Richmond is the perfect place to serve as a hub during this annual spring time event.” The state’s capital features three distinct tours highlighting different neighborhoods every year, as do all the tours. “That’s why we have visitors coming from all over the world who have made this a tradition. Every year is different, and this one is extra special because of the anniversary,” Lynn elaborates.

“Since 1929 Historic Garden Week has raised millions of dollars for the restoration of public gardens across Virginia. To celebrate Historic Garden Week is to celebrate these sites, especially this year when so many of the beneficiaries are supplementing the tours of private homes and gardens with additional activities,” notes Historic Garden Week State Chairman, Anne Geddy Cross. Exceptional in its conception and focus, Historic Garden Week has been heralded as “America’s Largest Open House.”

Historic Garden Week  2013 will feature approximately 200 private homes and gardens open on 32 separate tours throughout the state of Virginia over eight consecutive days.  It is the largest ongoing volunteer effort in Virginia and represents the coordinated efforts of 3,400 club members. 100% of tour proceeds are used to enhance Virginia’s landscape. For 80 years, the grounds of the Commonwealth’s most cherished historic landmarks have been restored or preserved with help from proceeds from Historic Garden Week including Mount Vernon, Monticello and the grounds of the Executive Mansion in Richmond.

The Williamsburg Garden Club will host it’s Historic Garden Week in Virginia on Tuesday, April 23, 2013 from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tours benefit the restoration of historic gardens and landscapes in Virginia. This year’s tour will feature homes in Colonial Williamsburg and West Landing in Kingsmill. including:

  • Tayloe House and Orland Jones House in Colonial Williamsburg
  • Three breathtaking homes & gardens in Kingsmill
  • Escorted Walking Garden Tour Colonial Williamsburg
  • Matthew Whaley Garden Tour
  • Kingsmill Historic Plantation Site

Luncheon and Special Event Information: Box lunches will be prepared by the chefs of Kingsmill Resort and served at the Historic Kingsmill Plantation Picnic Site.Cost is $15 per person, prepayment required. For Advance Tickets, General Information and Luncheon reservations contact Cathy Adams at cbtbka@cox.net.

Admission Fee: $35 Full price, $30 Advance

WILLIAMSBURG GARDEN CLUB HOME AND GARDEN TOUR

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Proceeds from Historic Garden Week benefit the restoration of historic gardens and landscapes throughout Virginia

COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG HOMES

orlando jones house colonial williamsburgOrlando Jones House, Kitchen and Garden, Corner of Duke of Gloucester Street and Colonial Street. This simple house with its distinctive projecting rear porch and compact oval garden is one of the most photographed in Colonial Williamsburg’s Revolutionary City. The earliest known owners of this property were Orlando Jones, a planter and burgess, who purchased these two lots from the city trustees in 1716. He was the son of the Reverend Rowland Jones, the first rector of Bruton Parish Church. Jones married Martha Macon in January 1703, and their granddaughter, Martha Dandridge, married George Washington. Jones inherited from his father an extensive estate on Timson’s Neck in York County.  Since there was already a substantial brick house on it, Jones maintained his primary residence there. His Williamsburg property was probably a tenement or a rental property.

A fire in 1842 swept away all the houses that once stood on this block including the Orlando Jones House. Archaeological excavations on this lot in the 1930’s revealed numerous brick foundations. The modest size of the structure, its simple weatherboard construction, and the rear porch wing with a room above are typical of Virginia houses of the first quarter of the 18th century. The projecting porch chamber, one of only three examples in Williamsburg, was usually seen in late 17th-century buildings in Virginia.

The house and kitchen are furnished with period reproduction furniture, textiles, artwork and lighting, mainly derived from the Colonial Williamsburg decorative arts collection. The floral arrangements reflect the Williamsburg style using materials from the spring garden appropriate for interiors of these period accommodations. Open for Historic Garden Week by Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Walking Garden Tour of Colonial Williamsburg Gardens. Tours are 10 a.m. to 4p.m. starting at the Orlando Jones Gardens in Colonial Williamsburg’s Revolutionary City.

Tayloe House, 207 East Nicholson Street. The house was built about 1755 and purchased in 1759 by John Tayloe II, a member of the Governor’s Council and one of the wealthiest men in Virginia. This property served as a townhome during the public times when the Governor’s Council was in session. Mr. Tayloe owned nine plantations and signs of his wealth are evident in and around the property: two privies, a large exterior kitchen, a detached laundry, a smokehouse, a storehouse, the floor-to-ceiling raised panel walls of the dining room and four interior closets. The 18th-century terraces, as well as a sundial discovered during the home’s restoration, reflect the status of the occupant. John Tayloe III owned the building in Washington, D.C., that is known today as the Octagon House. Tayloe house Williamsburg VA

After the British burned the President’s House during the war of 1812, the Octagon House became the residence of Dolly and James Madison until the executive mansion was restored. Mt. Airy in northern Virginia is still in the family.

In the entry is a marble and wrought-iron console table attached to the wall. It is one of three known to exist in America and one of two owned by Colonial Williamsburg. The original hanging lantern remains in the entry and dates from about 1815. Although now electrified, the lantern originally burned oil. The tenant enjoys needle arts. Many of the pieces in the home were made by her or were given to her as gifts by friends who share this passion. Open for Historic Garden Week by Ms. Kay Wilkinson.

KINGSMILL HOMES

image104 West Landing. Form and function blend beautifully in this Prairie School home that is a text book for the trademark handcraftsmanship of that style. Marked by horizontal lines and broad, overhanging eaves which are supported by Wisconsin stone pillars, the home embraces views of the original Kingsmill Plantation and of the 15th hole of the golf course that carries that name. The property’s encompassing grid-based design unifies the exterior spaces with the open floor plan interior, creating a convivial flow that emphasizes the structure’s thoughtful and well developed use as a comfortable family home. “Green” elements include “Shredded” bamboo flooring and cabinetry, recycled wood, radiant heat polished concrete flooring, a geo-thermal system, metal reflective roof and milk based paints. The entry view of the inglenook-style living area is framed by stacked stone columns. Descending steps lead to built-in seating and a stone fireplace. Vaulted cedar ceilings define the color palette. Double kitchens serve complimentary functions: one in the center of the home is complimented by a walled kitchen garden and the second is near the outdoor entertaining areas. Waterfall features of the infinity pool can be viewed through banks of windows and lend a tranquil grace. A grapevine-covered arbor is reflected in the pool and creates a sanctuary that can be reached from the master suite. Numerous potted gardens are managed with a self-watering irrigation system. Fragrance was an important guide in the selection of landscaping. Built in 2009 and open for Garden Week for the first time by Traci and Richard Alexander.

image135 West Landing. Set among the pines, an auspicious red door is flanked by unexpected drama of contemporary black wedge containers at this Georgian-style home. A charming folk art English bull dog “guards” the slate pathway that leads to the terraced back yard and boat dock. Pink floribunda roses cascade toward the James River, and raised stacked stone beds are filled with a mix of color including annuals, hellebore and hydrangea. This riverfront home has an always-on-vacation spirit inspired by a variety of vintage furnishing that create comfortable indoor and outdoor spaces including screened and open porches and, on a lower stone deck, a fire pit that is encircled with well-loved antique Adirondack furniture. A charming pergola awaits a party with whimsical Picasso-inspired chairs which contribute to the endless possibilities for enjoying bright spring days.

The rhythmic zigzag of the entry hall staircase leads the eye to look left to the Story and Clark baby grand piano in the living room but then lures attention to the hallway that introduces the relaxed den and light-filled water front kitchen. The farm-style breakfast table is surrounded by benches and chairs to accommodate this large and growing family. The den’s twin fireboxes and Kilim upholstered ottoman anchor a space whose walls are lined with photos from four generations. The first floor master bedroom overlooks the water and a footed tub offers a private oasis in this busy and youthful home. Open for Historic Garden Week for the first time by Dan and Anne Carr.

143 West Landing. Using architectural and lifestyle plans they have developed over several years, the homeowners designed magnificent living spaces that are a study in curves. The gentle arc of a Nautilus shell recurs in expansive windows, ceilings, walls, bar counter tops, staircases, shower stalls, light fixtures and even in terrace and pool edges. Themes of fire, water and texture unite the design and enliven details of this James River property. Water meets fire as it cascades down the stone fireplace from the soaring height of the living room ceiling. Fire and water combine again on the terrace as the infinity pool is bordered by the curving walls of the fire pit. Floors surfaces include white glass tiles, butterscotch-colored, wide plank birch and a deeply veined, brushed, chiseled and polished marble in tobacco. The ascending spiral staircase lands at a suspended bridge that joins the media room and the second floor bedrooms. Crossing the bridge affords views not only of the entry and living room, but also of the pool and river. On every floor level glass walls open onto terraces. An eclectic mix of furniture includes a bed that is suspended by guide wires. Open for Historic Garden Week for the first time by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Casey.

image168 West Landing. The unified vision of Chicago designer Tony Nie created a seamless balance between the landscape and the interior spaces of this gracious home. Gentle curves of low brick walls extend in welcome and seasonal flowers spill from a demi lune planter and draw focus to the entrance. A herringbone pathway leads to the first of several garden rooms including an extensive collection of hybrid tea roses, a passion of the owners. A boxwood crescent slopes down the hill and sweeps the eye to a covered porch featuring statues of the four elements. Deer resistant plants are tucked among mature trees in controlled woodland. A bronze statue draws focus to a softly flowing fountain, intricately patterned wrought iron fences and swirling topiaries. From the second floor terrace the intricate interplay of garden roomscapes presents an astonishing view. It is easy to see why the couple chose to be married in this garden.

Blended French and English traditional interiors are anticipated by the classic facades of the house. The home was featured in the September 2012, edition of The House and Home magazine. Home and Gardens open for Historic Garden Week for the first time.

OTHER PLACES OF INTEREST

Kingsmill Plantation Site. Once the center of a thriving, small riverbank community with an attended ferry landing, the Plantation’s grand mansion was situated on the current Plantation golf course and overlooked the James River. Although the main house was destroyed by fire in 1844, the two flanking dependencies and original garden steps remain.

Bruton Parish Church, corner of Duke of Gloucester Street and Palace Green.  Church docents offer free tours at regular intervals.  Churchyard restorations n 1936, 1955 and 2003 were funded by proceeds from Historic Garden Week.

Mattey’s Garden, Matthew Whaley Elementary School on Scotland Street. This award winning garden is listed on the National Garden Association’s Children’s Garden Registry and has hosted numerous groups from around the state. Mattey’s Garden will be open from 10 am to 3pm.

Tickets: Full ticket $35, includes admittance into each home and garden on the tour, transportation throughout the Revolutionary City via Colonial Williamsburg buses and the escorted Walking Garden Tour. Single-site admission $15. Children 13 and older, full price; ages 6-12 admitted for half-price if accompanied by an adult. Children 5 and under, free of charge. Tickets may be purchased at the Colonial Williamsburg Regional Visitor Center Monday, April 22, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesday, April 23, 9 a.m. to noon. On the day of the tour, full and single admission may be purchased throughout the tour site.

Advance Tickets: Full advance ticket $30 through April 20. CASH OR CHECK ONLY, at the following Williamsburg locations:

G. Bates Studio, Merchants Square; Seasons of Williamsburg, Jamestown Road; Wild Birds Unlimited, Monticello Marketplace, or by contacting Cathy Adams at the information below. Advance tickets may be purchased with a credit card by accessing www.vagardenweek.org.

Luncheon: Boxed lunches are $15 each and will be prepared by the chefs of Kingsmill Resort and served at the Historic Kingsmill Plantation Site and picnic area. Three lunch choices will be offered. Lunches must be reserved by April 10, 2013 and paid in advance. For more information about the lunches please contact Cathy Adams at cbtbka@cox.net or 757-220-2486.

All checks payable to Williamsburg Garden Club

Advance Tickets, Information and Luncheon Reservations:

Cathy Adams
757-220-2486
cbtbka@cox.net

Direction and Parking: From I-64 East or West to exit 242A to RT. 199 toward Jamestown/Williamsburg. For Kingsmill Home Tour turn left at stop light on Mounts Bay Road into Kingsmill (about one mile). Please let the guard at the gate knows you are touring homes on the Historic Garden Week Tour, they will provide a special pass and directions. For the Colonial Williamsburg Tour continue on RT. 199 past Kingsmill (Mounts Bay Road) about a mile and half and turn right at the light on Henry Street. Go 1.8 miles to stop light at corner of Henry and Francis. Turn right on Francis, go .5 miles to Tavern Parking on the right.

Visitor Center Parking and use the bus: From I-64 East or West, Exit 242A to RT. 199 toward Jamestown/Williamsburg about 3 miles to the Colonial Parkway toward Yorktown to Colonial Williamsburg Regional Visitor Center. Follow parkway signs to Visitor Center parking. Take Colonial Williamsburg Buses to the magazine bus stop.

Homes may be visited in any order. As a courtesy to homeowners, and for your own safety and comfort, please wear flat walking shoes. No interior photography, cell phones or smoking, please.

Colonial Williamsburg Announces 2013 Speakers Series

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation announced today a line-up of special speakers for 2013 that showcase the foundation’s role as a center for history and citizenship.

The series begins with award-winning designer, gardening and lifestyle expert P. Allen Smith, who will sign his books and deliver a presentation followed by a question-and-answer session from 4 – 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 13 at the Williamsburg Lodge. Smith, the host of P. Allen Smith’s Garden Home and P. Allen Smith’s Garden to Table on public television and Garden Style on commercial television will be in Williamsburg for the annual Colonial Williamsburg Garden Symposium. Admission is $30 ticket. Smith’s books will be available for purchase at $15 to $33.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham follows with a book signing and presentation on Thomas Jefferson’s life in Williamsburg 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Thursday, May 9 at the Williamsburg Lodge. Meacham’s latest book is “Thomas Jefferson: the Art of Power.” Meacham is executive editor at Random House, and a former editor of Newsweek and former co-anchor of the public-affairs broadcast, “Need to Know” on PBS. Tickets are $65 each and include lunch. Meacham’s books will be available for purchase separately at $16 to $35.

In addition to delivering the keynote speech during the annual Flag Day naturalization ceremony for new citizens at the Colonial Capitol, Greek-American author and syndicated columnist Arianna Huffington will present her observations and opinions on the media earlier that day during lunch 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Friday, June 14 at the Williamsburg Lodge. Best known for her news website, The Huffington Post, she is president and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post Media Group. Her presentation will include a question-and-answer session. Admission is $65 and includes lunch.

David Brooks anchors the speaker lineup. Brooks is a political and cultural columnist for The New York Times and a commentator on PBS NewsHour. He also worked as an editorial writer and film reviewer for the Washington Times; a reporter and op-ed editor for The Wall Street Journal; a senior editor at The Weekly Standard from its inception; a contributing editor at Newsweek and The Atlantic Monthly; and as a commentator on National Public Radio. Brooks will sign his books and speak on current events followed by a question-and-answer session 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16. Admission is $65 and includes lunch.

For more information or to purchase tickets for a 2013 Speakers Series event, visit http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/speakers/.

Garden Week in Williamsburg April 24, 2012

image5Every April, visitors are welcomed to more than 250 of Virginia’s most beautiful gardens, homes and historic landmarks during "America’s Largest Open House." Historic Garden Week provides visitors a unique opportunity to see unforgettable gardens at the peak of Virginia’s springtime color, as well as beautiful houses sparkling with fabulous flower arrangements.

This year celebrate spring by taking a step back in time on Williamsburg’s Historic Garden Week tour.  The Historic Garden Week tour in Williamsburg, part of the Virginia Statewide Historic Garden Week, is on April 24 and showcases several significant Civil War properties in the Colonial Williamsburg historic area and on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

image21The Civil War properties included in the tour this year are Bassett Hall, the Coke-Garrett House, the Palmer House, the President’s House at the College of William and Mary, and the Sir Christopher Wren Building. Also included on the tour are several picturesque homes and gardens built in the 20th century located just to the west of the College of William and Mary, including the   Hertzler-George Garden featured in Better Homes & Gardens Magazine , the Steele Home and Garden, and the Gilman Home. All three of these private properties are open to the public for the first time on this year’s Williamsburg Historic Garden Week tour.

In addition, the College of William and Mary will be hosting special escorted or self-guided walking tours on campus showcasing the trees, plants, architecture, and Civil War history of the College of William and Mary. The escorted tours will start at the Wren Yard at 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. Be sure to wear comfortable walking image8shoes!

Advance Tickets $25: buy them here or $30at the door

Also available through April 21, cash or check only, at the following locations: G. Bates Studio, Merchants Square; Seasons of Williamsburg, Jamestown Road; Wild Birds Unlimited, Monticello Marketplace.

Luncheon and Special Event Information: Lunches must be reserved and paid for in advance. This year’s site is The Hospitality House, located at 415 Richmond Road. Cost is $15 per person.

For more information about the Williamsburg tour and to make luncheon reservations email Cathy Adams at cbtbka@cox.net.

image15WHERE TO PARK WHEN TAKING THE WILLIAMSBURG GARDEN WEEK TOUR:
1). The Colonial Williamsburg Visitors Center. There you can buy your HGW ticket which will allow you to use the CW buses. Disembark at The Capitol bus stop and the Merchants Square bus stop.
2). The Williamsburg Taverns parking lot on Francis Street.
3). The City of Williamsburg Parking Garage at Henry and Scotland Streets and walk out through the Prince George Street exit.
4). The Williamsburg Hospitality House on Richmond Road (garages and back lot).
This is also the location for LUNCH.
5). Limited parking on city streets surrounding the properties.
Follow the Green Arrows and Historic Garden Week road signs.

Add to my calendar

Other Tours in the  Hampton Roads, Gloucester/ Mathews, Newport News. Portsmouth, Norfolk, Northern Neck areas of Virginia are listed below

Continue reading

Historic Garden Week in Williamsburg VA & Beyond

imageVA House & Garden Tours Offered Statewide

April 21-28, 2012

Every April, visitors are welcomed to more than 250 of Virginia’s most beautiful gardens, homes and historic landmarks during "America’s Largest Open House." Historic Garden Week provides visitors a unique opportunity to see unforgettable gardens at the peak of Virginia’s springtime color, as well as beautiful houses sparkling with fabulous flower arrangements.

This year celebrate spring by taking a step back in time on Williamsburg’s Historic Garden Week tour.  The Historic Garden Week tour in Williamsburg, part of the Virginia Statewide Historic Garden Week, is on April 24 and showcases several significant Civil War properties in the Colonial Williamsburg historic area and on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

The Civil War properties included in the tour this year are Bassett Hhertzler -george gardenall, the Coke-Garrett House, the Palmer House, the President’s House at the College of William and Mary, and the Sir Christopher Wren Building. Also included on the tour are several picturesque homes and gardens built in the 20th century located just to the west of the College of William and Mary, including the   Hertzler-George Garden featured in Better Homes & Gardens Magazine , the Steele Home and Garden, and the Gilman Home. All three of these private properties are open to the public for the first time on this year’s Williamsburg Historic Garden Week tour.

In addition, the College of William and Mary will be hosting special escorted or self-guided walking tours on campus showcasing the trees, plants, architecture, and Civil War history of the College of William and Mary. The escorted tours will start at the Wren Yard at 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. Be sure to wear comfortable walking imageshoes!

Advance Tickets $25: buy them here or $30at the door

Also available through April 21, cash or check only, at the following locations: G. Bates Studio, Merchants Square; Seasons of Williamsburg, Jamestown Road; Wild Birds Unlimited, Monticello Marketplace.

Luncheon and Special Event Information: Lunches must be reserved and paid for in advance. This year’s site is The Hospitality House, located at 415 Richmond Road. Cost is $15 per person.

For more information about the Williamsburg tour and to make luncheon reservations email Cathy Adams at cbtbka@cox.net.

imageWHERE TO PARK WHEN TAKING THE WILLIAMSBURG GARDEN WEEK TOUR:
1). The Colonial Williamsburg Visitors Center. There you can buy your HGW ticket which will allow you to use the CW buses. Disembark at The Capitol bus stop and the Merchants Square bus stop.
2). The Williamsburg Taverns parking lot on Francis Street.
3). The City of Williamsburg Parking Garage at Henry and Scotland Streets and walk out through the Prince George Street exit.
image4). The Williamsburg Hospitality House on Richmond Road (garages and back lot).
This is also the location for LUNCH.
5). Limited parking on city streets surrounding the properties.
Follow the Green Arrows and Historic Garden Week road signs.

Add to my calendar

Other Tours in the  Hampton Roads, Gloucester/ Mathews, Newport News. Portsmouth, Norfolk, Northern Neck areas of Virginia are listed below

Continue reading

2011 Historic Garden Week In Williamsburg VA

There is an upcoming garden activity that is sure to be blooming success. It’s the “Historic Garden Week of Virginia” presented by the Garden Club of Virginia.

In Virginia, April marks Historic Garden Week .This year marks the  78th anniversary season.  Visitors will step through the gates of more than 250 of Virginia’s most beautiful gardens, homes and historic landmarks during “America’s Largest Open House,” April 16-23, 2011. Three dozen Historic Garden Week tours present a rich mosaic of some of the country’s finest properties at the peak of Virginia’s springtime color. Sponsored by The Garden Club of Virginia, local events are scheduled from the Atlantic Ocean to the Allegheny Mountains and will span the centuries from the early 17th through the early 21st.

Virginia’s crown jewel of historic restoration, Colonial Williamsburg, will have special openings during the April 19 Garden Week tour here.  A ticket includes admittance to four restored Colonial-era houses and taverns, an escorted walking tour of the area’s recreated 18th century gardens, transportation via Colonial Williamsburg buses, and visits to lovely 20th century homes in the Walnut Hills neighborhood.  As always, this tour is an artful combination of old and new, featuring homes filled with handsome furnishings from many periods and origins.

Guests are also invited to visit the award-winning Mattey’s Garden, a project of the Williamsburg Garden Club, listed on the National Garden Association’s Children’s Garden Registry, and various other gardens open on tour day

imageProperties on the tour this year include the Blue Bell Tavern, Powell’s Tenement Kitchen, the Bracken Tenement and Kitchen, and Bruton Parish Church in the Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg, the Brooks Home and St. Mary’s Chapel in the Bruton Parish House just outside the Historic Area.  All of these locations are easily accessible by the Colonial Williamsburg Bus, free on Garden Day to ticket holders.  A mile and a half outside the Historic Area, two homes in Walnut Hills off Jamestown Road also are open.  Parking for those is in the Walsingham Academy parking lot, and shuttle buses transport visitors to the homes.

Full Ticket: $30, day of tour, includes admittance into each home and garden on tour transportation throughout the Historic Area via Colonial Williamsburg buses, and transportation via shuttle buses to Walnut Hills homes from Walsingham Academy.

Single-site admission  $10. Children ages 6-12 admitted for half-price if accompanied by an adult. Children 5 and under, free of charge. Tickets may be purchased at the Colonial Williamsburg Visitor Center Monday, April 18, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Tuesday, April 19, 9 a.m. to noon. On the day of the tour, full and single-admission tickets may be purchased throughout the tour site.

Advance tickets through April 16: $25, available until April 16 at the following Williamsburg locations: G. Bates Studio, Merchants Square; Seasons of Williamsburg, Jamestown Rd.; Wild Birds Unlimited, Monticello Marketplace. Cash or check only. For internet tickets, please access www.VAGardenweek.org .

Featured Homes and Gardens in Williamsburg for 2011 include :

imageBRACKEN TENEMENT AND KITCHEN, 206 E. Francis St. Bracken Tenement is typical of the Williamsburg residences of prosperous merchants, craftsmen and public officials at the end of the colonial period.  It appears on the Frenchman’s Map of 1782. Documents indicate it was owned but not occupied by the Reverend John Bracken from the mid-1780s through 1810. Bracken was minister of Bruton Parish Church, mayor of Williamsburg in 1800, and President of the College of William and Mary from 1812 to 1814. The plan, brickwork and surviving woodwork indicate it was built in the third quarter of the 18th century.

The original plan consisted of a central stair passage flanked by public rooms and two heated bedchambers above. The entry opens into a nine-foot wide stair passage, where the closed stringer staircase retains turned balusters, newel posts and molded handrail.

The tenement and kitchen both are furnished with period reproductions derived principally from the Colonial Williamsburg decorative arts collection. The floral arrangements reflect the Williamsburg style with an abundance of spring garden flowers appropriate for this period interior. Open for Garden Week by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

imageTHE BLUE BELL TAVERN, 102 N.Waller St.  John Redwood, keeper of the gaol and caretaker of the Capitol, bought this prominent lot in 1703 and a house was built there by 1707 when it was operated as a tavern. Col. Philip Ludwell purchased it in 1708 and his family rented to various tenants until 1832. Thomas Bramer ran a store here and by 1768 it was a tavern called the Blue Bell. Like the Coffeehouse newly constructed west of the Capitol, the Blue Bell had an open-hearth kitchen in the cellar. Today the cellar contains the cozy eat-in kitchen and family room.

The interior architectural details are based on several colonial homes throughout Williamsburg and Virginia; however the furnishings are anything but typical as the residents collect 19th and early 20th century antiques. The living room is richly decorated with elaborate, curvilinear Renaissance Revival furniture; the family room contains simple, rectilinear Craftsman-style pieces. Collections of early 20th century American Art pottery bowls, vases, and jardinières ornament the home throughout. Open for Garden Week by Janine Skerry and Edgard Moreno.

imagePOWELL’S TENEMENT KITCHEN, 108 N. Waller St.    Detached kitchens were placed in this relationship to dwelling houses throughout 18th century Williamsburg.  It sits on a lot bought by John Redwood in 1707, which was sold, along with the Blue Bell Tavern lot, to Col. Philip Ludwell in 1708.  Ludwell rented the dwelling house and outhouses here to tenants until 1832. Little is known about them except that in 1770, Peter Powell, a wheelwright and riding chair maker, lived here. The kitchen was presumably demolished around 1855 when John Mercer erected new buildings.

Reconstructed by Colonial Williamsburg in 1951, the kitchen was designed to comfortably accommodate a tenant rather than a historic exhibit. The cozy residence is furnished with a range of ingenious storage solutions, including a drop leaf table with storage space on both ends, a cedar chest that doubles as a coffee table and a library shelf that also serves as a display piece. The resident’s love for chinoiserie, ceramics, and dining are evident in her collections and books. The chiming, eight-day Sessions banjo clock is her prize possession. Open for the first time by Angelika R. Kuettner.

imageTHE BROOKS HOME, 518 S. England St. Built in 2009, this custom residence blends seamlessly with early 20th century homes two blocks from Colonial Williamsburg’s historic area. Adjoining the former home of the owner’s grandmother, it’s shaded by a decades-old oak she planted. Introduced by pocket gardens, the front porch opens to an interior that melds old with new. The entrance hall leads through a traditional dining room and study to an expansive living space especially designed for entertaining.  It encompasses a gourmet kitchen with hurricane granite countertops and living room with stone fireplace, cathedral ceiling, exposed beams and floor-to-ceiling rear windows. Also on the first floor, a stunning master bedroom with tray ceiling provides the owners with an elegant retreat. An enclosed back porch flows to a yard with brick patio, outdoor kitchen and comfortable furnishings for lounging and entertaining. Flower, herb and rain gardens surround the patio.

In addition to bedrooms, the second floor boasts a sitting room with balcony that overlooks the lower floor, backyard and the Golden Horseshoe golf course with especially stunning sunset views. Noteworthy throughout the home is artwork by the owner and her sister. Open for the first time by Nancy and Charles Brooks.

ESCORTED WALKING TOUR. An escorted walking tour of three gardens in the Historic Area will commence in the yard facing the Blue Bell Tavern. Included are ornamental pleasure gardens with period annuals, perennials and shrubs.  Tour visitors will glean information on garden design and landscape details in the Historic Area.  The gardens on tour are at the following sites: David Morton Shop and House, Christiana Campbell’s Tavern and the Elizabeth Carlos House. Tours begin at 10 a.m. and depart approximately every 15 minutes, each lasting 45 minutes. The final tour departs at 3 p.m.

imageBRUTON PARISH CHURCH, corner of Duke of Gloucester and Palace Green.  Church docents offer free tours at regular intervals. The churchyard was an early restoration of the Garden Club of Virginia in 1936-37, and 1955.  The 2003 renovation was also funded by proceeds from Historic Garden Week.  Across the street from the church is the Colonial Nursery, an interpretive site featuring 18th-century garden plantings, botanical histories, historically accurate plants and reproduction gardening tools.

MATTEY’S GARDEN, Matthew Whaley Elementary School on Scotland St. A project of the Williamsburg Garden Club, Mattey’s Garden was a gift to the city of Williamsburg for its 300th celebration and was dedicated in 1999. Each grade level is responsible for certain areas of the garden. The garden was awarded the Common Wealth Award as well as awards from the city of Williamsburg, Williamsburg Land Conservancy and the Historic Triangle Jamestown 2007 Beautification Contest. The garden is listed on the National Garden Association’s Children’s Garden Registry and has hosted numerous groups from around the state. Mattey’s Garden will be open for guided tours from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

imageADAMS GARDEN, corner of Richmond Rd. and N. Boundary St.  Dedicated in 1986, the garden has become a popular spot for outdoor lunches and study breaks. Originally planted with azaleas and small bulbs, this enchanting garden now includes interesting collections of woody and herbaceous material which can be viewed from the crushed oyster shell paths meandering throughout. The Williamsburg Garden Club continues its financial support of this quiet place of beauty. The Adams Garden will be open for guided tours from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on tour day.

Walnut Hills Homes

imageTHE DRISCOLL HOME, 4 Bayberry Ln. The first homeowners received this half-acre lot on Bayberry Lane from their mentor, John D. Rockefeller, Jr.  Built in 1957, the original one-story dwelling, with white-washed bricks set in Flemish bond, was inspired by a home that won a 1932 design competition. It is owned today by a young family who, while preserving its original features, expanded it in 2009 to incorporate their modern lifestyle. The elegant black-and-white marble entrance, flanked by bedrooms and library, leads down to the high-ceilinged living room with long bay window, modillion cornice, random width floors and wood-paneled, marble-surrounded fireplace. The formal dining room is dominated by hand-painted mural wallpaper made by Zuber on early 19th century hand-carved wood blocks.

Renovated into a wet bar passage, the original Pullman galley kitchen opens to the masterfully integrated two-story expansion. The addition features a spacious gourmet kitchen with marble countertops and vivid paint colors that showcase art work, and a lady’s study with custom cabinetry and clerestory. A window-lined hallway with terrace views leads to a private master bedroom suite. The lower level provides additional entertaining space and a mud room leading to the garage. Open for the first time by Margaret and Sean Driscoll.

Walnut hills WilliamsburgTHE JONES HOME, 99 Walnut Hills Dr. A serpentine brick drive leads to a wooded knoll and stately 1983 home inspired by the 18th century Sheldon’s Tavern in Litchfield, CT. At the entrance, columns support a central pedimented-pavilion with Palladian window.  The third story boasts a mansard roof with three dormer windows and balustrade.  Flanking the central hall, the dining room is notable for its wainscoting, crown molding, built-in corner cabinets and formal furnishings. Opposite, a gracious living room features a corner fireplace with hand-painted delftware tiles, carved wooden elephants and a full-length portrait of the owner, a gift from her husband. The family room is complemented by hand-crafted paneling and architectural details from a 19th century church once attended by family in Seymour, IN. Decorated with the owner’s apple collection, an island kitchen contains the back staircase. Overlooking lush gardens and including a casual dining area and sunroom, a 2006 window-filled addition provides the interior family room and kitchen with daytime light.

Home of Marty and Roger Jones.

Directions and Parking

To visit the Bracken Tenement and Kitchen, The Blue Bell Tavern, Powell’s Tenement Kitchen, Walking Tour Gardens and Bruton Parish Church and Churchyard in the Colonial Williamsburg Historic Area, from 1-64, take Exit 238 (Camp Peary, Colonial Williamsburg) and follow the official Colonial Williamsburg signs to the Visitor Center, where parking is available for cars and buses.  Full ticket holders may board the Colonial Williamsburg buses free of charge at the lower level of the Visitor Center for transportation to the Historic Area. Disembark at the Capitol Bus Stop on Waller St. to tour the Blue Bell Tavern, Powell’s Tenement Kitchen and the Escorted Walking Tour; and at the Magazine Bus Stop on Francis St. for The Bracken Tenement and Kitchen on Francis St. and Bruton Parish Church and Churchyard on Duke of Gloucester Street.

To visit the Brooks Home near the Historic Area, disembark at the Williamsburg Lodge Bus Stop on S. England Street, and walk two blocks south. The home is on the right.

To visit the Adams Garden, St. Mary’s Chapel and Luncheon in the Parish Hall and Mattey’s Garden disembark at the Merchant’s Square Bus Stop. Turn left on the Duke of Gloucester for the Adams Garden, located one block west at the corner of Boundary and Richmond Rd.  St. Mary’s Chapel and Luncheon is directly across the Duke of Gloucester in the Bruton Parish Hall. For Mattey’s Garden, walk two blocks north on N. Henry St., turn right.

To visit the homes in Walnut Hills, from the Visitor Center take the Colonial Parkway south toward Jamestown. Exit the Colonial Parkway at Rt. 199 West. At the stop sign, take a left onto S. Henry St. Turn right at the traffic light onto Rt. 199 West. Proceed approximately 1.8 mi. to the second traffic light.  Turn right onto Jamestown Rd. At the next stoplight, turn right into Walsingham Academy, where buses will shuttle you to and from the Driscoll and Jones homes.  Parking is not available on neighborhood streets.

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