• Click Here to Subscribe to Email updates

  • psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813
  • RSS Colonial Williamsburg News

    • THE WORD ON DOG STREET: REVERSING ATTENDANCE TRENDS
      The word on DoG Street is that the program changes at Colonial Williamsburg over the past few years have led to a decline in attendance. In fact, just the opposite is true. In 2014, after President Mitchell Reiss and his new team brought innovative program changes to CW, attendance rose after a seven-year decline. For...Read More »
    • An Open Letter to the Colonial Williamsburg Community
      The role of Williamsburg in America’s founding is nothing short of extraordinary. In the years leading up to the Revolution, this colonial capital city was a thriving center of culture, enterprise, education — and revolutionary ideas. It was here — in these homes, government halls and taverns — that Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and so...Read More » […]
    • An Insiders Guide to the 4th of July Festivities 2017
      We hope you’re making plans to celebrate independence the right way—with us! Our 4th of July festivities will feature a lot more than spectacular fireworks. We offered a preview a couple weeks ago–now here’s your practical guide for navigating the day. This year’s theme is “Light and Liberty,” drawn from a letter Thomas Jefferson wrote...Read More » […]
    • 7 Ways Our Free App Will Improve Your Visit
      The official Colonial Williamsburg Explorer app just received another big upgrade, so now there are even more reasons to make sure you make it part of your visit. Our website is a great way to plan your adventure from home, but when you’re here, the app is an indispensable tool to make the most of...Read More »
    • Reflections of a Revolutionary in Residence
      “Papi, am I a princess?” “Yes, Anabella, you are. But we all are. In our country every one of us is a king or a princess,” I said, echoing the words of young Mr. Jefferson as played by Kurt Smith. She was right to ask: my family was feted like never before during my recent...Read More »
  • Flickr Photos

Colonial Williamsburg Plans Reconstruction of 18th-century Market House

Colonial Williamsburg trustee and major benefactor Forrest Mars Jr. of Big Horn, Wyo., has made a $1 million commitment for construction of a Market House in the center of the Revolutionary City. It is the third major historic reconstruction funded by Forrest Mars since 2007 with gift funds totaling $11 million.

“Forrest Mars’ most recent gift for the Market House affirms his belief in the importance of the Revolutionary City as a stage for teaching history and engaging guests,” said Colin Campbell, president and CEO of The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. “We are extremely grateful for his vision and his generosity.”

Early in the 18th century, the colonial legislature set aside an open space midway between the Capitol and the College of William and Mary to be used for markets and fairs. By midcentury, Market Square was an important center of community life with daily markets and auctions.

image

Despite its well-known existence, physical evidence of Williamsburg’s 1757 market house is scarce. The building was used through the early 19th century until it was replaced by a new structure in 1835. During the earliest years of the restoration, Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin repeatedly urged reconstruction of the Market House, but the time was never right. Today, reconstruction of the 18th-century market house will restore one of the central features of Market Square, bringing greater vitality and authenticity to Colonial Williamsburg’s interpretation of economic and social life in colonial America.

“I am excited by the prospect of having a new market building as the centerpiece of commerce in today’s Revolutionary City, just as it was in the 18th century,” said foundation trustee Forrest Mars.

Colonial Williamsburg’s reconstructed market house will be a wooden structure on a brick base, measuring approximately 20 feet in width and 40 feet in length with a shingled hip roof. The sides of the building will be entirely or partially open.

Archaeology on the Market Square site will be conducted this summer. A possible timetable may have a reconstructed Market House in use by 2015. When the new market house is complete, it will serve as the location for outdoor sales, adding to the vibrancy of the Revolutionary City experience.

Previous gifts by Forrest Mars include $5 million for reconstruction and endowment of R. Charlton’s Coffeehouse and $5 million for reconstruction and endowment of the James Anderson Blacksmith Shop and Public Armoury, including the recently completed Tin Shop, which formally opens this fall.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: