• psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813

Free Admission to Historic Jamestowne and Yorktown Battlefield

National Park ServiceThe National Park Service is waiving entrance fees at all national parks on today through Monday  ( January 15-17th, 2011 )

Locally in  the Williamsburg VA area both Historic Jamestowne and Yorktown Battlefield are  included in the FEE FREE WEEKEND.

If you can’t make it in this weekend there are couple more dates in 2011 so plan ahead.

  • April 16-24, National Park Week;
  • June 21, first day of summer;
  • Sept. 24, National Public Lands Day; and
  • Nov. 11-13, Veterans Day

Explore other National Parks in Virginia here

Did you know that Seniors 62+ can obtain a Lifetime Pass to our National Parks  for only $10 ? This has to be one of the best senior travel bargains anywhere.

Senior passSenior Pass Eligibility
As part of the American the Beautiful – National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass program, U.S. citizens or permanent residents who are at least 62 years old can purchase a Senior Pass for a one-time processing fee of $10. This Senior Pass to national parks and lands offers benefits to you and your traveling companions.

Senior Pass to National Parks Benefits

  • In National Parks that charge an entrance or standard amenity fee, the Senior Pass admits you and the passengers in your car or other private vehicle.
  • In National Parks where a "per person" entrance fee is charged, the Senior Pass admits you plus three other adults (who need not be seniors). This is an especially good deal if you are also traveling with grandchildren, because children under 16 have free admission.
  • The lifetime national parks Senior Pass also gives seniors a 50 percent discount on federal use fees charged for camping, swimming, boat launching, parking and tours.
  • In some cases where use fees are charged, only the person named on the Senior Pass will be given the 50 percent discount.
  • The senior pass is non-transferable and does not cover or reduce special recreation permit fees or concession fees charged by private companies.

How to Buy a National Parks Lifetime Senior Pass
The Senior Pass to national parks cannot be purchased by mail or online. It must be purchased in person at a federal area where entrance fees are charged, or at regional offices of the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Proof of age, such as a valid driver’s license, is required at the time you purchase your senior pass.

For more information about the National Parks Lifetime Senior Pass, call the National Park Service at 1-888-ASK-USGS

Veterans Day in the Historic Triangle and Hampton Roads Va

Veterans_Day Williamsburg, VA This year’s Veterans Day ceremony is scheduled for 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 11, at the Williamsburg Community Building on N. Boundary Street. The event offers those participating a special time to honor all military veterans, living and deceased, and is sponsored by the Greater Williamsburg Combined Veterans Organizations.
Read about other Veterans Day events in Williamsburg, Hampton Roads and Richmond VA

Continue reading

Historic Triangle Featured in National Geographic Traveler Magazine

traveler-november-december-09 National Geographic Traveler magazine is featuring the Historic Triangle, Chesapeake Bay and Shenandoah Valley on its list of the world’s iconic destinations.

The magazine’s list ranks the world’s most celebrated travel destinations and how well they’ve weathered mass tourism while protecting the environment. The list will appear in the magazine’s November-December issue.

The Historic Triangle – Williamsburg, Yorktown and Jamestown – ranked the best among the Virginia destinations and was listed in the "Places Doing Well" category.

The Chesapeake Bay was in the "Places with Troubles" category, and the Shenandoah Valley was among "Places in the Balance."

Here is a representative sampling of additional anonymous comments from the panelists.

"Beautiful, with considerable historic character. The region has an excellent tourism infrastructure, and some areas are particularly well done: The recent work at Jamestown is superb, especially the archaeology and its interpretation; and the ongoing character of Williamsburg remains a key charm. The sustainability question is key—such as the expense of operating something like Colonial Williamsburg—and operational costs and government cuts to agencies such as the National Park Service (Yorktown) are a long-term concern."

"Williamsburg is a fascinating living museum. But its antiseptic quality belies the reality of life in the 18th century."

"The Colonial Williamsburg restored area and national parks at Yorktown and Jamestown are best experienced by the Colonial Parkway, which is still a pristine drive that links all three destinations and buffers them from the sprawl culture. Williamsburg has devolved into little more than an upscale suburban enclave. The growing residential population clings to a faux colonial aesthetic that is applied to homes, shops, and strip malls."

Read more here

Or buy the issue now on news stands.

 

Williamsburg, Jamestown, Yorktown Videos

It’s amazing to me how many high quality videos there are about our great area. What’s also surprising is how few people have watched them. Here are just a few that I wanted to share. If you are curious about the history of the Williamsburg, Jamestown, Yorktown, VA area history then spend a few minutes and watch the following videos.  Each one is only a few minutes long. You can watch more of them here.
You can also learn more about both Jamestown and Yorktown at the The Jamestown Yorktown Foundation website by clicking here

Map with locations of Jamestown, Williamsburg and Yorktown VA

Map picture

WordPress Tags: Williamsburg,Jamestown,Yorktown,area,Here,history,Foundation,locations

Williamsburg, Yorktown, A Revolutionary Trip

Revolution

The delegates of the 5th Virginia Convention, meeting in Williamsburg, Wednesday, May 15, 1776, agreed unanimously to instruct Virginia’s representatives at the Continental Congress in Philadelphia to propose that the colonies declare themselves free and independent states absolved from all allegiance to, or dependence upon, the crown or parliament of Great Britain. Seven weeks later, the Declaration of Independence proclaimed why the colonies had chosen independence. In Williamsburg, the Convention’s delegates drafted a declaration of rights and a constitution for Virginia, creating a society in which the people, not the monarch, were sovereign.

The Revolution had to be won on the battlefield, however. War had broken out a year earlier with skirmishes between British troops and Massachusetts militia at Lexington and Concord. It would continue for six years before the decisive battle of Yorktown. There, in October 1781, American and French troops led by George Washington defeated a British army commanded by General Charles Lord Cornwallis.

Don’t Miss

  •  

    Yorktown Victory Center

    This museum of the American Revolution chronicles America’s struggle for independence from the beginnings of colonial unrest to the formation of the nation. A new Declaration of Independence Gallery emphasizes the dramatic impact and relevance of this historic document. Exhibits also provide eyewitness accounts of the war and describe the convergence of forces in October 1781 at the Siege of Yorktown. “The Legacy of Yorktown: Virginia Beckons” exhibit examines how people from different cultures shaped a society and incorporates the theme of creating a national government with the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Outdoors, historical interpreters engage visitors in demonstrations of everyday life during the Revolutionary era, in re-creations of a Continental Army encampment, and 1780s Tidewater Virginia farm.

    Visit: http://www.historyisfun.org

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    Colonial Williamsburg

    Each day, the Historic Area features Revolutionary City, a dynamic two-hour event during which guests witness – and participate in – the “Collapse of the Royal Government, 1774-1776,” and the struggles of “Citizens at War, 1776-1781.” Other sites of importance during the Revolution include the Palace, where the last royal governor Lord Dunmore resided, the Magazine, from which British marines stole the colony’s powder in April 1775 fueling a crisis that led to war, and the Capitol, where the General Assembly passed the crucial legislation that created the state of Virginia.

    Visit: http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com

  •  

    Yorktown Battlefield

    When Prime Minister Frederick Lord North learned that Cornwallis had surrendered to Washington, he reputedly said, “Oh God, it’s all over.” It was. Guests can tour siege lines and fortifications, witness artillery demonstrations, and step into Washington’s tent.

    Visit: http://www.nps.gov/yonb/