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  • psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813
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Colonial Heritage Williamsburg Virginia 55+ Active Adult Community

Finely crafted  homes combined with a amazing $18 million amenity package make Colonial Heritage in Williamsburg Virginia one of Virginia’s premier golf communities for active adults age 55 and better.Colonial Heritage features an impressive selection of traditionally styled luxury homes, carriage homes and villas surrounding a magnificent 170 + acre Arthur Hills golf course, with a spacious clubhouse, a deluxe athletic club, indoor and outdoor pools and a community-oriented activities program that will help make your social life as full as you like.The low-maintenance homes have been carefully designed for gracious single-level living, incorporating spacious ground-floor master suites and open and airy floor plans that are perfect for entertaining.  Some of the homes incorporate basements.The property is located only minutes away from Colonial Williamsburg and the many other cultural and historical attractions of eastern Virginia’s tidewater region, offering buyers an unsurpassed lifestyle that blends city conveniences with small-town charm, low real estate taxes and truly beautiful surroundings. Standard features on the new homes at Colonial Heritage include: Merillat Furniture Finished Cabinetry,Granite Countertop with Stainless Steel Sink,GE® Gourmet Kitchen w/Multi Cycle Dishwasher, side by side Stainbless Refrigerator w/Icemaker and Waterline, Gas Cooktop, Wall Oven (per plan) and Microwave , 13 Seer Carrier® Air Conditioning w/Digital Thermostat, Carrier® High Efficiency Gas Furnance, OSB Exterior Sheething, 80 Gallon Electric Hot Water Heater,  36” Fireplace—Gas Direct Vent with Remote control, Structured Wiring Package, Seagull® Lighting Package and Recess Lighting, Ceiling Fan in Every Bedroom, Sunroom, and Family Room, Professional Paint Package, Colonial Trim Package, Hardwood Flooring (per plan), Ceramic Tile Floors in all Baths, Laundry, & Sunroom (per plan), Convenient Laundry Room with Laundry Tub (per plan),  Variety of Exterior Elevations and Coordinated Color Schemes, Low Maintenance Exterior, Certainteed Landmark 25 year Fiberglass Roof Shingles, Double Pane insulated Low-E Glass Windows, Raised Panel Garage Door w/Automatic Openers and Remote Control

 

Colonial Heritage Info:
 
 

 

The 18-hole “Colonial” course at the Colonial Heritage Golf Club facility in Williamsburg, Virginia features 6,889 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 72. Designed by Arthur Hills, ASGCA, the Colonial golf course opened in 2006. Western Golf Properties, LLC manages this facility, with Tim Johnson as the General Manager.

Acreage: 1500 acres
Gatehouse: The development features gated entry with 24-hour staffing.
Club Structure: Colonial Heritage is a semiprivate club. Golf memberships are available to homeowners, but are not required to use club facilities.
Golf: The centerpiece of the community is a superb championship golf course designed by the renowned Arthur Hills. The course winds its way through the neighborhoods of Colonial Heritage, with a practice putting green, driving range and pro shop on-site.
Clubhouse: The focal point of recreational, social and cultural activities within the community is an exquisite 25,000-square-foot clubhouse with a grand ballroom, fine and casual dining, a relaxing lounge, card and billiard rooms, a library with computer stations, a woodworking shop and an arts and crafts room.The Fitness Center, which is equipped with state of the art workout equipment, also houses an indoor swimming pool and workout classroom. The Fitness Center is staffed by caring professionals. In addition, there is a seasonal outdoor swimming pool, four (4) tennis courts, two (2) Bocce Courts, and the beautiful 18 hole championship golf course right outside your door that provides Colonial Heritage residents an enviable lifestyle here that is anything but retiring.
Tennis: Four hard tennis courts
Fitness:  The Fitness Center, which is equipped with state of the art workout equipment, also houses an indoor swimming pool and workout classroom. The Fitness Center is staffed by caring professionals. In addition, there is a seasonal outdoor swimming pool, four (4) tennis courts, two (2) Bocce Courts, and the beautiful 18 hole championship golf course right outside your door that provides Colonial Heritage residents an enviable lifestyle here that is anything but retiring. Fitness classes offered include, Aerobics, Aquacise, Body Sculpting, Yoga, and Personal Training
Recreation: Additional recreational facilities include tennis courts, manicured green space for lawn sports and miles of hiking and biking trails, with a full-time recreation director on staff to organize a full calendar of community events and activities.
Swimming: Private recreational facilities include an outdoor pool with an expansive terrace and a heated indoor pool and whirlpool.
Dining and Shopping: The Williamsburg area harbors a wide spectrum of dining and retail options, including several major shopping malls, arts and crafts centers, antiques dealers and outlet shops located minutes away from Colonial Heritage. The clubhouse offers a choice of casual and fine dining, while area restaurants range from fast food chains to gourmet restaurants, many specializing in nouvelle and traditional American fare.
Area Attractions: Virginia’s Historic Triangle region is one of the nation’s top destinations for historical tourism, with the fascinating colonial settlements of Williamsburg, Jamestown and Yorktown joined by the 23-mile Colonial Parkway. In addition to Colonial Williamsburg and other well-preserved pre-Revolutionary settlements, residents have easy access to the Blue Ridge Mountains, the scenic Virginia wine country and to fishing and boating on Chesapeake Bay and the James and York rivers. Colonial Heritage is less than an hour from Richmond, Virginia’s vibrant capital city, about 60 miles from Virginia Beach and 150 miles from Washington, D.C.
Health Care: The Sentara Williamsburg Regional Medical Center located a few minutes from the development offers a 24-bed emergency room along with a wide range of modern medical services.
Homes: Buyers can choose from a selection of quality single-family homes, villas and carriage homes with prices ranging from the mid $200’s to $500’s both new and resale homes are available. 

 

 

 


 Comments from Golfers at Colonial Heritage:

 2008  Best secret in Williamsburg!!

-Beautiful, well-maintained, chess game.

Yardage book is a must. Luckily, they handed me one when I paid.
Study the book carefully and decide your strategy all the way to the green BEFORE you put your tee in the ground!
This is not a “grip it and rip it” course. On several holes, you really need to weigh risk/ reward before you pull out the driver. Many people complain about this course being too hard– but it is not at all, if you THINK first!

Best thing about it…. it’s empty! I played last weekend (Labor Day). Saturday I played 9 holes, teed off around 5:30. Sunday I played 18, starting around 4. I did not see another person on the course. No Exaggeration!

If you want a beautiful chess game of a golf course all to yourself, you gotta try this place!

(I debated quite a bit about sharing my secret, but its too good not to share. Plus, I’d hate for them to close because of lack of business, it’s obvious they put a lot of money into the maintenance. So, PLEASE don’t come when I’m there… I like it empty.)

 2008
 

We were a female and a new male golfer, and we played this challenging – gorgeous! – course in July, ’08 in 106 degree weather. It was a fantastic golf course/experience, and we will be sure to recommend the course to all our friends. In fact, we’d even consider moving to the community – just to have more access to the course. It is spectacular!

ProShop personnel were friendly and helpful, and there was a valuable booklet available for purchase that gave excellent descriptions of each hole – and was available for only $1.00!!!

Final comment – don’t be intimidated. It’s a challenging course, but it’s well within the reach of players who are aware of their own capabilities and willing to let better players play-thru and enjoy their own game.

2008
Beautiful and deceptive, some will say too tricky, and I will guarantee it kicks your butt by ten strokes more than you usually shoot. Too many blind shots make it imperative to have a map of the hole or caddy neither of which are provided. (You do get a pin placement map but that is it). My heart hurts to see such a beautiful course falling to recession with a skeleton staff, no on course attendants, and a cloud of doom on the faces of the few remaining workers.
2008
Gorgeous course! Local knowledge a huge plus. Greens like pool table tops, yet very fair.
2007
wow, what a beautiful course! very challenging. must hit fairways to score well. excellent!
 
Some of the Social clubs at Colonial Heritage include : A William and Mary Sport Team Support Club, Cribbage Club, Bridge Club, Marathon Bridge Club, Bocce Club, Billiards Club, Pickleball Club, Mah Jongg, Poker Club, Line Dancing, Round Dancing, Square Dancing, Knitting Group, Quilting Group, Woodworking Club, Book Club, Library Club, Dining Club, Singles Group,  Drama Club, Travel Club, Bluegrass Country Music, History Club, Photography Club,

 

 

Williamsburg VA Real Estate “Living in Stonehouse” First person account

The following is excepted from the Stonehouse Gazette a newsletter for Stonehouse residents in Toano, VA I wanted to share it with anyone thinking of moving to the Williamsburg Va area. It gives a great sense of living in the area and relocating from NY.

Playing the role of Adolph Phillipse at the Philipsburg Manor restoration site in Sleepy Hollow, NY, circa 1750, where  he worked on Saturdays as an interpreter is only one of the many facets of Bob Spencer who, with  his wife Carolyn, resides in The Orchard Hill section of Stonehouse in Toano, James City County Virginia Just a few minutes drive from Williamsburg VA.

 This Princeton University and Columbia University Law School graduate’s current activities in the Williambsurg VA area  include Board Member of the Peninsula Agency for the Aging, Board Member of Vibrant Life Ministry, Rotary Club member, Richmond Civil War Roundtable, Christopher Wren lecturer, Williamsburg United Methodist Church, James City County Concerned Citizens, and, of course, the  Stonehouse Board of Directors. This, and more, in addition to a continuing legal practice in Westchester County, New York.

Bob and Carolyn moved to Stonehouse in 2005 after 38 years in Tarrytown, NY. “It took us about 30 minutes to decide to live here,” he said. Having discovered Stonehouse on their own, they were “very impressed” with the look and feel of the community. “We really loved the design of our house and the relatively small lot,  which meant less upkeep.” Compared with Westchester County, the low real estate taxes and the low cost of the golf course were real “bonuses.” ( in the Williamsburg VA area)

What they like best about living in the  Stonehouse community in Toano VA is “the many new friends that we have made, particularly the Orchard Hill group. We also appreciate the country feel of the community and the fact that the developer really did leave many trees.”

In his third year as a member of the Board, Bob says he spends “an average of 10 hours per week” on community business. In his “spare time,” he tries to play golf ( there are 16+ public courses in the Williamsburg Va area)  but says, “My golfing partners have to put up with a lot.” He and Carolyn are looking forward to a family reunion in July, which will be attended by their two biological sons, two adopted Korean daughters, their foster daughter, their Rotary Exchange daughter from Belgium, and their 8 grandchildren.

As Board President of Stonehouse for the past 2 years, Bob’s goal was “to keep residents advised of Board activities as much as possible; to give residents an opportunity to communicate with the Board; and to maintain Stonehouse as a quality place to live.” He is most proud of “guiding the community through the transition from developer control to owner control” and the dedication of so many residents who provide outstanding community service on committees and other volunteer activities.

His long-range goals include “having more resident involvement in community activities of Stonehouse; completing the transition; evaluating resident responses to the Strategic Planning Committee; implementing suggestions that will continue to make Stonehouse a community for all residents, including our children; and working with GS Stonehouse ( The new owner of the undeveloped part of Stonehouse) to develop the overall community.”

Moving/Retiring to Willamsburg VA For young and old alike !

I wanted to share an excellent post by by Andrew Petkofsky for Virginia Business. I have added a few links to direct you to areas of information.

Ken Carr retired to Williamsburg because he didn’t want to get away from it all. As a sales and marketing executive in the fashion industry, he had enjoyed a fast-paced career and was looking for a gentler climate than his home in the Chicago suburbs.

But nice weather and recreational options were only part of it: Carr also hoped for opportunities to keep busy and take on new challenges. “You spend your life working, as many of us have, five or six days a week with the pulse of business,” he says. “To just have that stop, psychologically, I didn’t find that it was all that appealing.”

When Carr moved with his wife, Nancy, to the gated community of Ford’s Colony in 1999, he immediately occupied himself building a retirement house. Someone asked if he would sell it, so he built another.

Then he became increasingly involved sharing his business experience with those just starting out. Carr connects with business clients through the Service Corps of Retired Executives, a national program coordinated locally through the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance. “It’s a great way to use the expertise that you have,” says Carr, who is 65. “It’s also an incredible opportunity for businesses or organizations to get people who are very accomplished to assist them — the kind of team that quite frankly they couldn’t go out and hire.”

In fact, so many former executives and high-ranking military officers have retired to Williamsburg that a number of other organizations, including the College of William & Mary and its Mason School of Business have created local programs to harness their expertise.

The post-career challenges are not reserved solely for former captains of industry. Other retirees in the area take classes in a large continuing education program, teach in the same program and even help operate a professional chamber orchestra in Williamsburg. “We wind up with some very bright early retirees who still want to make contributions,” says Keith Taylor, director of James City County’s office of economic development.

The Williamsburg area (including James City County and upper York County) has become a retirement mecca. Money magazine named the region one of the country’s best places to retire. The magazine cited attributes such as the area’s history, culture, green space and access to health care and airports.
The area’s growing reputation among retirees has been helped by a constellation of attractions including the Colonial Williamsburg living history museum, the College of William & Mary, award-winning golf courses, a handful of prestigious gated communities, close access to tidal rivers and the ocean, and a location only three hours away from Washington, D.C.

As the retirement-age population grows, older residents are redefining the options available for their golden years and, in the process, reshaping the community. Kingsmill on the James, opened in the 1970s as the region’s first gated community, now has the company of several other retiree-friendly residential areas protected by gates or private security forces. These include Ford’s Colony and The Governor’s Land at Two Rivers.

Williamsburg Va real estate search

Williamsburg Va real estate search

 Two recent arrivals, Colonial Heritage and The Settlement at Powhattan Creek in James City, requires that residents be 55 or older.

A boom in mixed-used developments also appeals to the preferences of an older population. These projects group shopping, restaurants and low-maintenance residences such as condos and town houses in one location. “Folks are looking more and more at access to retail and entertainment within walking distance of their homes,” says James R. Golden, associate vice president for economic development at William & Mary. “The retirement community is sort of a leader in this.”

Golden helped promote the development of New Town, a mixed-use community just outside Williamsburg. Now a second, similar development, High Street, is under construction in the city. Riverside Health System also has proposed a mixed-use community, Quarterpath at Williamsburg, which would include a hospital, a nursing home and housing. State approval has not yet been granted for the hospital, which would be the Williamsburg area’s second.

Community leaders see the retirement boom as a largely positive economic force that may create jobs for younger folks in areas such as health care, retail and other services. The officials point out that many of those retiring to Williamsburg from other areas, especially the Northeast, are well-heeled professionals and business executives who have chosen to end their careers while still in their 50s. “When you develop a vibrant retirement community … they will pay for services that they want and appreciate, and that will open up opportunities for people that want to fill those needs,” says Richard Schreiber, president and CEO of the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance.

One side effect of becoming a retirement mecca is that land and housing prices in the region have risen to levels beyond the means of many workers in service jobs. “It’s sort of creat­ing a greater shortage of affordable housing,” says Rick Hanson, James City’s director of housing and community development. “A lot of people that work in James City do find the housing costs prohibitive, and they will commute in.”

The cost of housing can also be a problem for some retirees who spent their working years in the community. But local governments are trying to solve the problem. Hanson’s office recently assembled a parcel for development of low-rent senior housing in cooperation with a local nonprofit organization. He says the county also has commissioned a consultant to analyze housing needs and report this fall.

Numbers help tell the story of Williamsburg’s growing popularity as a place to retire. William & Mary and the Center for Excellence in Aging and Geriatric Health, a local organization created to promote the health of older people, reported in 2003 that the 60-and-older population in Williamsburg, James City and upper York grew more than 65 percent, from 5,688 to 10,686, between 1990 and 2000. The 60-and-over population in Virginia as a whole grew 17.1 percent in the same period. Growth in the same group nationwide was 9.4 percent, according to the study, which was based on U.S. Census figures. During this same period, the area’s overall population grew about 27 percent, from 54,980 to 69,763.

Pete Williamson says he retired in Williamsburg partly because the city and its surroundings seem just as full of families and younger people as folks of his generation. Even his affluent Governor’s Land neighborhood seems to be attracting a good number of families, he says. “We have a community with a mix of young and old with school kids and retirees,” Williamson says. “We’re not some retirement community out in the middle of nowhere where you have to drive a half hour just to go to a grocery store.”

Williamson was living in Wilton, Conn., and working as an IBM program manager when he retired in 1994 at the age of 54. A volunteer job with an ambulance corps became full-time work before he and his wife moved to Williamsburg in 1998.

Now 67, Williamson co-leads a 40- to-60-mile bicycle ride for the local bike club ( Williamsburg Area Bicyclists) once or twice a week. He also serves on the board of his neighborhood’s homeowners association and does computer work as a member of a charity tennis group that raised about $45,000 last year for a local hospice.

It’s hard to pinpoint the exact size of the region’s retirement community because there’s no set age for retirement. Louis Rossiter, a former Virginia secretary of health and human resources who’s now director of community health service research for the Center for Excellence in Aging and Geriatric Health, says Williamsburg may serve as a model in developing programs that can be adopted elsewhere.

Thinking ahead is important, says Rossiter, because an older population brings potential problems along with benefits. “When the retirees move here, they’re in good health. Then they age in place,” he says. “Who will take care of them as they become more frail?”

The Center for Excellence is a consortium of colleges, hospitals and health agencies that conducts sponsored research into such subjects as Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis, and studies ways to improve access to medical care. More significant for local retirees, the center also offers geriatric services not generally available in the community, such as memory assessment and driving evaluation.

For high-ranking military retirees, Williamsburg offers something beyond resort communities and golf courses: easy access to Washington. “Lot’s of people continue some kind of consulting but don’t want to live in D.C. — they’ve had that experience,” says William & Mary’s Golden, himself a retired Army brigadier general.

Local organizations increasingly are coming up with ways to capture the interests of these retirees and take advantage of their skills. The Mason School of Business at William & Mary, for example, enlists 90 retirees in its Executive Partners program as mentors for students and faculty and as consultants to companies looking for advice. “The joke is they come, play golf six months and get bored,” says Jonathan Palmer, the school’s associate dean. “We engage them at a very high and active level.”

In addition to mentoring others, Williamsburg retirees are interested in learning something new. William & Mary’s Christopher Wren Association, an education program for retirees, attracted more than 1,400 students last semester to more than 60 classes. Retirees served as faculty for many of the classes.

The Chamber & Tourism Alliance last year began a Community Leadership Service in which 16 retirees who moved to the community recently took a crash course about the region, its governmental structure and inner workings. Participants now are creating a database of retired people with skills that could benefit local nonprofit organizations, says Schreiber, the chamber president.

Leading the database project is Joan Peterson, who was recruited because she chaired the education committee of the Williamsburg Symphonia, a professional chamber orchestra. Peterson moved to Williamsburg from Massachusetts when her husband took early retirement from Hewlett-Packard. She had been director of summer programs for a private school. Now a bit more than four years later, her husband is commuting regularly to consulting jobs in Minneapolis and Seattle, and she is immersed in a project she hopes will benefit nonprofits and retirees. “I absolutely love Williamsburg,” says Peterson. “I would have a hard time coming up with things I don’t like about it. Except maybe for the rapid growth. Everyone wants to be the last one in, I guess.”

 

 

For further information about moving or retiring  in the Williamsburg VA area, golf course homes,  real estate , homes, communities, developments, neighborhoods or building lots in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, Gloucester or York County Virginia  contact:John Womeldorf/ REALTOR

 

Liz Moore & Associates 757 254 8136

John@MrWilliamsburg.com  email

www.MrWilliamsburg.com/  Williamsburg VA Real Estate website

www.MrBurg.com Williamsburg Va Real Estate website  

www.MrHamptonroads.com/  Hampton Roads Va Real Estate website

www.MrTidewater.com/  Tidewater VA Real Estate website

www.MrVaBeach.com/ Va Beach Va Real Estate website

  

Williamsburg Real Estate Resource. Search for Homes & Land for sale in Williamsburg Virginia & surrounding areas  click here :CLICK HERE WILLIAMSBURG VA MLS HOME SEARCH

  CLICK HERE FOR Real Estate Home Search  Tidewater Hampton Roads Va 

  

My other area Real Estate and Information Blogs for Hampton Roads/ Tidewater/ Williamsburg Virignia and surrounding areas

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog II

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog

Williamsburg Happenings/ Events Blog

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