• psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813

Reasons to move to or live in Williamsburg Virginia (IMHO)

I have posted this before but here you go:Great Schools, Friendly people, Lots of parks, NO SHOPPING MALL, small town, interesting mix of people from all walks of life, great restaraunts, Ukrops, trader Joes, Colonial Williamsburg, Jamestown, Busch Gardens, Water Country, New Town, William and Mary, Voted one of the Top 5 Best places to retire by Money Magazine, Good neighbor passes to Colonial Williamsburg, Grand Illumination at Christmas, Great Wolf Lodge, Farmers Market on Duke on Gloucester, Kimball Theater ,Williamsburg Regional Library Concert Series, Driving on Colonial Parkway from Jamestown to Yorktown, Williamsburg Winery/ Wedmore Place, Dinner at Chownings Tavern/ Fat Canary/ Blue Talon, Opus 9, Le Yaca, Desert at the Trellis ” Death by Chocolate”, Capital to Capital Bicycle Trail, Muscarelle Museum of Art, Dewey Decibel Concert Series at the Williamsburg Library Theatre, Golf at Golden Horshoe Golf Club, Williamsburg National, Stonehouse, Kiskiak, etc 17 Local Courses, First Night Williamsburg at New Years, Historic Jamestown. Jamestown Settlement, Working out at James City County Recreation Center
Grocery Shopping at Ukrops, The Fresh Market, Trader Joes, Brewster’s Ice Cream
SUMMER BREEZE CONCERT SERIES Concerts on Duke of Gloucester Street, Shopping at Prime Outlets, Market Square, Williamsburg Pottery, Bush Neck Farm – Pick-your-own strawberries, apples, blueberries, asparagus, sweet corn, peaches, pumpkins., Pumpkinville at Halloween, Busch Gardens Seasons Passes “Howl-O-Scream” at Halloween, Water Country, The Plantations along Rt 5 , Shirley, Sherwood, Berkley etc., Williamsburg Ale Werks Williamsburg’s only Microbrewery ,William & Mary Football/ Tailgate Parties in the Fall, Mountain Bike Trails Freedom Park, New Quarter Park York River State Park ,Kayaking/ paddle boats at Chickahominy Riverfront Park, Waller Mill Park and Little Creek Reservoir, Concerts at the newly renovated amphitheater at William & Mary
Paul’s Deli, Greenleafe Cafe, The wonderful playground Kidsburg/ Mid County Park, Skate Park at JCC Rec Center, New Town and it’s wonderful shops and resturants, Phi Beta Kappa Hall – Performing Arts Series, Ewell Hall, Department of Music – Performing Arts Series, Christopher Wren Society
Virginia Symphony Orchestra, Classics at St. Bede Concert Series, The Virginia Arts Festival presents performances by the world’s top-flight artists in classical music, dance, theatre and jazz.
The Williamsburg Symphonia, Classical Music Series, Virginia Shakespeare Festival @ W&M
Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Aromas Coffehouse, An Occasion for the Arts
Colonial Polo Cup 2007, Tavern Ghost Walks in Colonial Williamsburg, “Revolutionary City,”
Spend the night in a Colonial Home in Williamsburg, 4th of July fireworks at Busch Gardens and Colonial Williamsburg, The Spa of Colonial Williamsburg , McCormick-Nagelsen Tennis Center
Spending the night at the Williamsburg Inn or Lodge ,Youth Sports Teams: Baseball, Soccer, Lacrosse, Swimming, Football, Volleyball, Wrestling, Karate, Ballet, etc. WISC (Williamsburg Indoor Sports Center), Blueberry pancakes at Chickahominy House, Christmas Parade in Colonial Williamsburg, Tide Radio and WBACH radio stations, William & Mary College”The second Oldest College in the U.S., Kingsmill, Fords Colony, Governors Land, Stonehouse, Greensprings neighborhoods all with wonderful golf facilities.

Moving or relocating to Williamsburg VA

I have a few questions about possibly moving/ relocating to  Williamsburg VA 

  1. How friendly are the people?  Williamsburg VA is a melting pot of nationalities. To me it is one of the friendliest places we have lived. If you have children get them involved in sports or school activities and you will meet tons of families who are very outgoing.
  2. Are there plenty of activities for children and active adults?   Yes and Yes. Depends on what your children like to do but ours enjoy Busch Gardens, Water Country, Colonial Williamsburg, Summer Camps, Boating, Jet Skiing, Horse back riding, football ( playing and watching, tailgating at W & M)), soccer, basketball, baseball track and field, bowling, movies, hiking, swimming ( lots of swim teams) Mountain Biking, lacrosse,  The Beach in VA Beach or Outer Banks, The Mountains ( 2.5 hours away, Virginia Living Museum ( animals, reptiles, fish, etc, festivals, Great Wolf Lodge ( in the winter for birthday parties) Kayaking,  Skate Park near the Rec Center, The Rec Center ( indoor pool ) The Christmas Parade, Forth of July, Grand Illumination, Kidsburg ( when they were younger) snowboarding ,Skiing in the mountains ( 3 hours away)
  3. For adults, in addition to the above we enjoy  at running ( my wife) cycling ( me), concerts at Lake MAtoaka, VA Arts Festival, Williamsburg, Syphonia, Museums, Corner Pocket, Kimball Theater, Great Restaurants,  VA Arts Festivals, Farmers Market on DOG St., Shakespeare Festival, Polo Cup, An occasion for the arts, Tennis, Golf the list goes on…
  4. What is the cost to rent a nice house? Definitely. There are numerous homes in great neighborhoods for $2000 and below. Currently there are some in Fords Colony, Stonehouse ( a $600k new home),Windsor Forest, Brandon Woods, Landfall at Jamestown and many more.
  5. Is is sunny most of the year? Besides winter of course.  Very sunny maybe too sunny. It was a very dry summer… kind of humid in the Summer.
  6. How harsh is the winter? Very mild. We hardly ever get an accumulation of snow anymore in Williamsburg. I haven’t had to shovel any snow in over 6 years.
  7. Do you have a hospital near by? Brand new Sentara Williamsburg  ttp://www.sentara.com/Sentara/HospitalsFacilities/Hospitals/Williamsburg/ They are trying to get another hospital approved on the east side of Williamsburg as well.

Moving/Retiring to Willamsburg VA For young and old alike !

I wanted to share an excellent post by by Andrew Petkofsky for Virginia Business. I have added a few links to direct you to areas of information.

Ken Carr retired to Williamsburg because he didn’t want to get away from it all. As a sales and marketing executive in the fashion industry, he had enjoyed a fast-paced career and was looking for a gentler climate than his home in the Chicago suburbs.

But nice weather and recreational options were only part of it: Carr also hoped for opportunities to keep busy and take on new challenges. “You spend your life working, as many of us have, five or six days a week with the pulse of business,” he says. “To just have that stop, psychologically, I didn’t find that it was all that appealing.”

When Carr moved with his wife, Nancy, to the gated community of Ford’s Colony in 1999, he immediately occupied himself building a retirement house. Someone asked if he would sell it, so he built another.

Then he became increasingly involved sharing his business experience with those just starting out. Carr connects with business clients through the Service Corps of Retired Executives, a national program coordinated locally through the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance. “It’s a great way to use the expertise that you have,” says Carr, who is 65. “It’s also an incredible opportunity for businesses or organizations to get people who are very accomplished to assist them — the kind of team that quite frankly they couldn’t go out and hire.”

In fact, so many former executives and high-ranking military officers have retired to Williamsburg that a number of other organizations, including the College of William & Mary and its Mason School of Business have created local programs to harness their expertise.

The post-career challenges are not reserved solely for former captains of industry. Other retirees in the area take classes in a large continuing education program, teach in the same program and even help operate a professional chamber orchestra in Williamsburg. “We wind up with some very bright early retirees who still want to make contributions,” says Keith Taylor, director of James City County’s office of economic development.

The Williamsburg area (including James City County and upper York County) has become a retirement mecca. Money magazine named the region one of the country’s best places to retire. The magazine cited attributes such as the area’s history, culture, green space and access to health care and airports.
The area’s growing reputation among retirees has been helped by a constellation of attractions including the Colonial Williamsburg living history museum, the College of William & Mary, award-winning golf courses, a handful of prestigious gated communities, close access to tidal rivers and the ocean, and a location only three hours away from Washington, D.C.

As the retirement-age population grows, older residents are redefining the options available for their golden years and, in the process, reshaping the community. Kingsmill on the James, opened in the 1970s as the region’s first gated community, now has the company of several other retiree-friendly residential areas protected by gates or private security forces. These include Ford’s Colony and The Governor’s Land at Two Rivers.

Williamsburg Va real estate search

Williamsburg Va real estate search

 Two recent arrivals, Colonial Heritage and The Settlement at Powhattan Creek in James City, requires that residents be 55 or older.

A boom in mixed-used developments also appeals to the preferences of an older population. These projects group shopping, restaurants and low-maintenance residences such as condos and town houses in one location. “Folks are looking more and more at access to retail and entertainment within walking distance of their homes,” says James R. Golden, associate vice president for economic development at William & Mary. “The retirement community is sort of a leader in this.”

Golden helped promote the development of New Town, a mixed-use community just outside Williamsburg. Now a second, similar development, High Street, is under construction in the city. Riverside Health System also has proposed a mixed-use community, Quarterpath at Williamsburg, which would include a hospital, a nursing home and housing. State approval has not yet been granted for the hospital, which would be the Williamsburg area’s second.

Community leaders see the retirement boom as a largely positive economic force that may create jobs for younger folks in areas such as health care, retail and other services. The officials point out that many of those retiring to Williamsburg from other areas, especially the Northeast, are well-heeled professionals and business executives who have chosen to end their careers while still in their 50s. “When you develop a vibrant retirement community … they will pay for services that they want and appreciate, and that will open up opportunities for people that want to fill those needs,” says Richard Schreiber, president and CEO of the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance.

One side effect of becoming a retirement mecca is that land and housing prices in the region have risen to levels beyond the means of many workers in service jobs. “It’s sort of creat­ing a greater shortage of affordable housing,” says Rick Hanson, James City’s director of housing and community development. “A lot of people that work in James City do find the housing costs prohibitive, and they will commute in.”

The cost of housing can also be a problem for some retirees who spent their working years in the community. But local governments are trying to solve the problem. Hanson’s office recently assembled a parcel for development of low-rent senior housing in cooperation with a local nonprofit organization. He says the county also has commissioned a consultant to analyze housing needs and report this fall.

Numbers help tell the story of Williamsburg’s growing popularity as a place to retire. William & Mary and the Center for Excellence in Aging and Geriatric Health, a local organization created to promote the health of older people, reported in 2003 that the 60-and-older population in Williamsburg, James City and upper York grew more than 65 percent, from 5,688 to 10,686, between 1990 and 2000. The 60-and-over population in Virginia as a whole grew 17.1 percent in the same period. Growth in the same group nationwide was 9.4 percent, according to the study, which was based on U.S. Census figures. During this same period, the area’s overall population grew about 27 percent, from 54,980 to 69,763.

Pete Williamson says he retired in Williamsburg partly because the city and its surroundings seem just as full of families and younger people as folks of his generation. Even his affluent Governor’s Land neighborhood seems to be attracting a good number of families, he says. “We have a community with a mix of young and old with school kids and retirees,” Williamson says. “We’re not some retirement community out in the middle of nowhere where you have to drive a half hour just to go to a grocery store.”

Williamson was living in Wilton, Conn., and working as an IBM program manager when he retired in 1994 at the age of 54. A volunteer job with an ambulance corps became full-time work before he and his wife moved to Williamsburg in 1998.

Now 67, Williamson co-leads a 40- to-60-mile bicycle ride for the local bike club ( Williamsburg Area Bicyclists) once or twice a week. He also serves on the board of his neighborhood’s homeowners association and does computer work as a member of a charity tennis group that raised about $45,000 last year for a local hospice.

It’s hard to pinpoint the exact size of the region’s retirement community because there’s no set age for retirement. Louis Rossiter, a former Virginia secretary of health and human resources who’s now director of community health service research for the Center for Excellence in Aging and Geriatric Health, says Williamsburg may serve as a model in developing programs that can be adopted elsewhere.

Thinking ahead is important, says Rossiter, because an older population brings potential problems along with benefits. “When the retirees move here, they’re in good health. Then they age in place,” he says. “Who will take care of them as they become more frail?”

The Center for Excellence is a consortium of colleges, hospitals and health agencies that conducts sponsored research into such subjects as Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis, and studies ways to improve access to medical care. More significant for local retirees, the center also offers geriatric services not generally available in the community, such as memory assessment and driving evaluation.

For high-ranking military retirees, Williamsburg offers something beyond resort communities and golf courses: easy access to Washington. “Lot’s of people continue some kind of consulting but don’t want to live in D.C. — they’ve had that experience,” says William & Mary’s Golden, himself a retired Army brigadier general.

Local organizations increasingly are coming up with ways to capture the interests of these retirees and take advantage of their skills. The Mason School of Business at William & Mary, for example, enlists 90 retirees in its Executive Partners program as mentors for students and faculty and as consultants to companies looking for advice. “The joke is they come, play golf six months and get bored,” says Jonathan Palmer, the school’s associate dean. “We engage them at a very high and active level.”

In addition to mentoring others, Williamsburg retirees are interested in learning something new. William & Mary’s Christopher Wren Association, an education program for retirees, attracted more than 1,400 students last semester to more than 60 classes. Retirees served as faculty for many of the classes.

The Chamber & Tourism Alliance last year began a Community Leadership Service in which 16 retirees who moved to the community recently took a crash course about the region, its governmental structure and inner workings. Participants now are creating a database of retired people with skills that could benefit local nonprofit organizations, says Schreiber, the chamber president.

Leading the database project is Joan Peterson, who was recruited because she chaired the education committee of the Williamsburg Symphonia, a professional chamber orchestra. Peterson moved to Williamsburg from Massachusetts when her husband took early retirement from Hewlett-Packard. She had been director of summer programs for a private school. Now a bit more than four years later, her husband is commuting regularly to consulting jobs in Minneapolis and Seattle, and she is immersed in a project she hopes will benefit nonprofits and retirees. “I absolutely love Williamsburg,” says Peterson. “I would have a hard time coming up with things I don’t like about it. Except maybe for the rapid growth. Everyone wants to be the last one in, I guess.”

 

 

For further information about moving or retiring  in the Williamsburg VA area, golf course homes,  real estate , homes, communities, developments, neighborhoods or building lots in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, Gloucester or York County Virginia  contact:John Womeldorf/ REALTOR

 

Liz Moore & Associates 757 254 8136

John@MrWilliamsburg.com  email

www.MrWilliamsburg.com/  Williamsburg VA Real Estate website

www.MrBurg.com Williamsburg Va Real Estate website  

www.MrHamptonroads.com/  Hampton Roads Va Real Estate website

www.MrTidewater.com/  Tidewater VA Real Estate website

www.MrVaBeach.com/ Va Beach Va Real Estate website

  

Williamsburg Real Estate Resource. Search for Homes & Land for sale in Williamsburg Virginia & surrounding areas  click here :CLICK HERE WILLIAMSBURG VA MLS HOME SEARCH

  CLICK HERE FOR Real Estate Home Search  Tidewater Hampton Roads Va 

  

My other area Real Estate and Information Blogs for Hampton Roads/ Tidewater/ Williamsburg Virignia and surrounding areas

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog II

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog

Williamsburg Happenings/ Events Blog

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