• psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813

Vote for Williamsburg Farmers Market

Let the world know you love Williamsburg Farmers Market by casting your vote in American Farmland Trust’s America’s Favorite Farmers Markets ™ contest today!

As of today we are #2 in Virginia.

Cast your vote here

Voting, closes at midnight on Labor Day (September 3). The leader board is available here www.votemyfarmersmarket.org.

 

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In 2009 the market was voted the #1 market in the nation among mid-size markets in America’s Favorite Farmers Markets Contest! Since then the market has continued to be in the top 10 in the nation and with your vote can be #1.

The goal of American Farmland Trust’s  annual America’s Favorite Farmers Markets contest is to highlight the role that farmers markets play in keeping family farmers on the land. The summer long contest is a nationwide challenge to see which markets can rally the most votes from their customers. At the end of the contest, four winning markets—one small, one medium, one mid-size, and one large—will receive the title of America’s Favorite Farmers Market for 2012. The winning markets will be featured in the media and will be honored at local celebrations organized by American Farmland Trust.

Here is what one Williamsburg Farmers Market customer had to say:

This market takes great pride in promoting locally grown/harvested products-vegetables, seafood, baked items, berries, cheeses, peanuts, flowers, etc. . .

farmers marketThe market, Held on Merchant’s Square in Williamsburg, Virginia, retains the air of a modern-day marketplace, bustling with trade amidst the historic buildings that once played a key role in our country’s Colonial era. From pawpaw fruit to peanuts and seafood, the vendors at the Williamsburg Farmers Market showcase a true variety of local and regional products. (The market is also known as the place to meet for the community’s canine citizens.)

W&M among ‘America’s Top Colleges’

William & Mary is among the country’s top universities, according to rankings released by Forbes on Aug. 1.

In the “America’s Top Colleges” guide to 650 undergraduate institutions, the College is the second-highest ranked state-supported school in the country. The university comes in at fourth among the country’s public universities (including military institutions) and 40th overall, up from 49th last year. William & Mary is also 21st among research universities on the list.

According to the Forbes website, the annual rankings are compiled by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. They are based on five areas: post graduate success, student satisfaction, debt, four-year graduation rates and competitive awards.

Only two state-supported schools ranked in the top 50 of the annual report, and both are located in Virginia: William & Mary and the University of Virginia, which was ranked at 36th. The other three public institutions that made the top 50 are all military-related, with the United States Military Academy coming in at seventh, the United States Air Force Academy at 35th and the United States Naval Academy at 43rd.

The complete rankings may be found online at www.forbes.com/top-colleges. They will also appear in the Aug. 20 issue of Forbes Magazine.

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Preview Busch Gardens before everyone else ( almost)

busch gardens williamsburg Before Busch Gardens Williamsburg opens to the public for the season, they throw open the gates, roll out the red carpet, and allow season pass members an exclusive sneak peek at the park. 

This years preview day is March 20, 2010

Celebrity wildlife expert Jack Hanna is back with his animal entourage. Visitors to the park can spend some time with him and a few of his furry friends at a delicious all-you-care-to-eat breakfast or lunch, or check out one of his amazing animal shows happening throughout the day.

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Harris Teeter out of bidding for Ukrops Grocery

Ukrop’s is again in the headlines for a possible sale. And like last time, it’s because a grocery industry website ran a blurb about a possible sale

Harris Teeter is supposedly out of the running to purchase Ukrop’s Super Markets, according to a report published yesterday by Supermarket News, a trade magazine for the food distribution industry. 

The report states that Harris Teeter was outbid for the Richmond-based grocer by an unnamed private equity group that is now in "exclusive negotiations" to buy Ukrop’s. The report is based on anonymous sources.

Representatives from both Ukrop’s and Harris Teeter both indicated that they do not comment on rumors or speculation.

“Although Harris Teeter was considered a good strategic fit for Ukrop’s, deteriorating performance at the latter made valuations difficult, a source said. Delhaize Group ( Food Lion) and Ahold ( Giant ) were also said to be strategic suitors.”

Question is  Where are the leaks? Or, put another way, who is breaching confidentiality?

Normally in a situation like this you don’t these types of rumors.

Typically, an investment bank would take a prospectus to several companies that might be a good fit, including other grocery stores and private equity groups that buy those sorts of retailers. They would not promote the fact that the company is for sale and circulate a prospectus.

And normally deals of this sort for a private company stay private until the companies involved issue a news release. The investment banks that help companies buy and sell one another have their reputation at stake, so it’s unlikely they’ve leaked the news.

No information has been discovered on which investment bank is working for Ukrop’s, or if the company has hired one.

ukropswilliamsburgva Ukrop’s has 28 stores in Virginia, including one in Williamsburg VA . The grocer also for now owns about half of First Market Bank, but that’s being sold to Bowling Green-based Union Bankshares Corp. in a deal expected to close this fall.

Harris Teeter, a North Carolina-based grocer that is expanding in Northern Virginia, has announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot distribution warehouse in King George County’s industrial park. The grocer signed an agreement with the county in January and was given three months to do a feasibility study. The company still hasn’t closed on the property and recently got its fourth extension.

Ruddick Corp., which is Harris Teeter’s parent company, recently indicated in a quarterly earnings report that the company is still studying alternatives to the site, and if it goes forward the timeline will be delayed beyond the originally stated 2012 completion.

Berkeley’s Green Neighborhood- A Williamsburg VA Neighborhood Spotight

A Master Planned Community,  Berkeley’s Green showcases a wide range of custom built resale homes and is located in James City County/Williamsburg,  berkleys green lake clubhouse williamsburg va neighborhood Virginia near  the grounds of the historic Greensprings Plantation .  Berkeley’s Green is named for Greensprings Plantation owner and former Governor of Virginia  Sir William Berkeley (pronounced “bark-lee”) who was governor from 1641-1652 and 1660-1677.

Resale home prices in Berkeley’s Green start in the  $300,000’s.

Berkeley’s Green neighborhood amenities include a clubhouse, pool, playground,  tennis courts, gazebo, picnic area, pond,  walking/biking trails.

An active homeowner association has many  social events throughout the year.

berkleysgreenhomes Detached homes offered in Berkeley’s Green  in Williamsburg / James City County offer an array of architectural styles  and  home choices. There are models from 3 bedrooms to 5 bedrooms. Square footages range from 1700 to over 2500 square feet.

Located on approximately 142  acres, Berkeley’s Green has approximately 280 homes.

The community was started in 1989 and home construction continued in stages house berkleys green james city countythrough the year 2000. The monthly home owner fee in Berkeley’s Green  is $33 . This fee covers all common area and facility maintenance ( entrances, playgrounds, park areas ),  use of the  pool, clubhouse , playground and tennis courts.

Lots sizes in Berkeley’s Green average about a quarter acre. Trees abound amid the pool berkleys green williamsburg va established streets and cul de sacs throughout the community.

A popular activity for residents is walking, jogging or cycling on the Virginia Capital Trail. A portion of which is only a few steps from the Berkley’s Green neighborhood. This trail when complete will connect Virginia’s  past and present capitals of Jamestown, Williamsburg and Richmond along the Scenic Route 5 corridor. The Capital Trail will traverses 50+ miles, five jurisdictions and 400 years rich in history along one of the first inland routes in North America.

Home Sale prices in the last 12 months  in Berkeley’s Green ranged from $287,000 to $367,400. List prices, as of today, range from $310,000 to $364,000. The average days on market for  homes in the Berkley’s Green neighborhood in the last 12 months was 83 days . The average price per square foot on homes sold in the last 12 months was $156.78 . Eight  homes sold in Berkeley’s Green in the last 12 months and five are currently for sale as of March 2009.

View a sold home report for Berkeley’s Green here.

(Sales Data from the WAAR/ Williamsburg Area Association of Realtors/ WMLS)

Current Williamsburg/ James City County Schools for The Berkeley’s Green Community are Matoaka Elementary, James Blair Middle and Jamestown High School
See School Statistics for Williamsburg VA area schools here

View area demographics- 23188

Click here to Search all homes for sale in Berkley’s Green

Click here to search all Williamsburg, James City, York County,New Kent , Gloucester homes for sale currently listed in the WMLS

Location Map of Berkeley’s Green Community in Williamsburg, VA

All information believed to be reliable, but not guaranteed
Copyright 2008, Mr Williamsburg.com LLC

Colonial Williamsburg, VA – Video of Colonial Williamsburg & Golden Horseshoe Golf

Vodpod videos no longer available.  

Here is is short five minute video From Golfweek and GolfTV that will give you a feel for both Colonial Williamsburg and the multiple award winning Golden Horseshoe Golf Course.

 

Where is Waldo and is he reading Mr Williamsburg’s Blog ?

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Apparently real estate in the Williamsburg and Hampton Roads  areas is of interest to readers worldwide. The picture at left was from early Saturday morning on March 14,2009. I have noticed more and more readers from all over the world perusing this blog.
As you can see on this day there were readers from Copenhagen Denmark, Calcutta, India, France, Salzburg, Austria and Khabarovsk, Russia along with many more from the U.S..

If you have any questions about the area, communities, neighborhoods,  golf, cultural activities, museums,recreation, homes for sale, sales statistics, financing a home, kids activities, shopping, opening a business, waterfront ,schools, condos, town homes,neighborhoods, living in or selling a home in Williamsburg or Hampton Roads VA please drop me an email at John@MrWilliamsburg.com  I am happy to answer any and all that I can. If I don’t have the answer I will know where to send you to for a response.

 

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Marcia Ball at The Corner Pocket in Williamsburg

cornerpocket Don’t forget – Marcia Ball performs at the Corner Pocket this Thursday!  Tickets are $25 – get them while they last!  Doors open at 6 pm.  For more information on Marcia Ball, visit her official websiteThe Corner Pocket is located in New Town., Williamsburg, VA

A few notes from her Bio:  The simple mention of a Louisiana or Texas roadhouse conjures up images of a crowded dancehall filled wall-to-wall with rabid music fans rocking to a hotter-than-hot band playing a smoldering blend of swampy R&B, jumping blues and heart-wrenching ballads. Pianist/vocalist/songwriter Marcia Ball brings that spirit to every concert she plays and every song she records. Her music is mixed with equal parts simmering soul fervor and two-fisted piano pounding. Between her deeply emotive vocals and her incisive, often poignant songwriting, Ball is in a class by herself.

Williamsburg VA Real Estate Tax Rates Income Tax, Sales tax, Personal Property Tax

Common questions I am asked from people are considering moving to Wiiliamsburg VA or Hampton Roads VA.

 Question:What are your taxes for real estate ? Personal Property Tax ? Income Tax ? Sales Tax ?  Gas Tax ?  Cigarette Tax ? What about for York County ? James City County ? The State of Virginia ?

This information is current as of Jan 1, 2009

City of Williamsburg VA   real estate tax .54 Per $100, 3.50 personal property tax

James City County VA Real Estate Tax .77 per $100 , 4.00 per $100 personal Property Tax
York 0.698  per $100 real estate tax, $4.00 per $100 personal property tax rate

No tax on first $20k in value click below for explanation  

You can read the exemption details for automotive personal property tax rates here

 Virginia’s income tax rates are assessed over five tax brackets:

 — 2 percent on the first $3,000 of taxable income.
— 3 percent on taxable income between $3,001 and $5,000.
— 5 percent on taxable income between $5,001 and $17,000.
— 5.75 percent on taxable income of $17,001 and above.

 Sales Taxes
State Sales Tax: 5.0% (includes statewide local tax of 1%) (prescription and non-prescription drugs exempt); Food purchased for home consumption is taxed at 1.5%. 
Gasoline Tax: 19.6 cents/gallon
Diesel Fuel Tax: 19.6 cents/gallon
(Local option tax adds 2% to fuel tax)
Cigarette Tax: 30 cents/pack of 20

Personal Income Taxes
Tax Rate Range: Low – 2.0%; High – 5.75%
Income Brackets: Lowest – $3,000; Highest – $17,000
Number of Brackets: 4
Personal Exemptions: Single – $930; Married – $1,860; Dependents – $930 (Tax year 2008)
Standard Deduction: Single – $3,000; Married filing jointly – $5,000

Property Taxes
In the State of Virginia property taxes are administered by the state’s cities, counties and towns and are based on 100% of fair market value.  Tangible personal property is also taxed at the local level and is based on a percentage of the original cost.  A county, city, or town may enact a program for senior citizens and disabled persons allowing for exemption, deferral (or a combination of both) for property taxes on realty and manufactured homes owned and occupied as the sole dwelling of a person 65 years of age or older.  Annual family income is generally limited to $50,000, but may be higher in certain Northern Virginia communities.  Net worth limits may apply.  There are no adjustments at the state level.  

Click here for more information on Virginia State Income taxes:

Or find the exact info below that you are looking for

  • Tax Forms and Instructions — Download printable forms and instructions
  • Filing Requirements — Learn about who needs to file and filing thresholds
  • Individual FAQs — Frequently Asked Questions for Individual Income Tax
  • Residency Status — Are you a Resident, a Nonresident, or a Part-Year Resident? Find out the correct method to file.
  • Military Tax Tips — Find information on all special filing provisions for members of the military and their spouses.
  • Completing Your Return — Information on how to complete your return. Information on subtractions, deductions, credits, contributions, etc is available here.

Medical/Dental Deduction: Partial. Individuals may deduct long-term health care insurance premiums, provided the premiums have not been deducted for federal income tax purposes. The premiums must be paid specifically for a long-term health care policy.  The amount to be subtracted is the cost of long-term health care insurance premiums that has not been deducted on your federal return.

Federal Income Tax Deduction: None

Retirement Income Taxes: Taxpayers age 65 and older are eligible for a deduction of $12,000, subject to the following income limitations.  The deduction of $12,000 will be reduced by one dollar for each dollar that their Adjusted Federal Adjusted Gross Income exceeds the following thresholds: single – $50,000, married – $75,000 (total for both), married filing separately – $75,000 (total for both).  “Adjusted federal adjusted gross income” means the federal adjusted gross income reduced by the taxable Social Security and Tier 1 Railroad Retirement benefits reported as a Virginia subtraction.  Virginia law exempts Social Security and Tier 1 Railroad Retirement benefits fro taxation.  If you are required to include any of your benefits in federal adjusted gross income, subtract that amount on your Virginia return.  Pension income received while you are a Virginia resident is taxable by Virginia, even though it may have been received from another state.  However, federal legislation enacted January 1, 1996 prohibits any state from taxing pension payments made to a resident of another state.  Even though your pension from another state is taxable in Virginia, it should not be taxed by the other state.  Virginia residents are subject to tax on their entire incomes, including federal annuities and military pensions.  To the extent that these payments are reported in federal adjusted gross income, they are also subject to Virginia income tax.

Retired Military Pay: Follows federal tax rules.  Military retirement income received by those awarded the Medal of Honor can be subtracted from federal gross income for tax purposes.
Military Disability Retired Pay: Disability Portion – Length of Service Pay; Member on September 24, 1975 – No tax; Not Member on September 24, 1975 – Taxed, unless combat incurred.  Retired Pay – Based solely on disability: Member on September 24, 1975 – No tax; Not Member on September 24, 1975 – Taxed, unless all pay based on disability and disability resulted from armed conflict, extra-hazardous service, simulated war, or an instrumentality of war.

VA Disability Dependency and Indemnity Compensation: Not subject to federal or state taxes
Military SBP/SSBP/RCSBP/RSFPP: Generally subject to state taxes for those states with income tax.  Check with state department of revenue office.

Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real EstateJohn Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg and Hampton Roads, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

 Mr Williamsburg is a local Realtor assisting home buyers and sellers in the Hampton Roads and Williamsburg areas of Virginia.

Contact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation ,taxes,employment, shopping or anything else about the area.

Search Homes for Sale

Click here to Search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, York, Gloucester, Charles City Virginia

Click here to search all building lots in James City County, York County, City of Williamsburg and New Kent County

Click here to search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Va Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth,Franklin, Sussex, Southhampton, Emporia, Greenville, Mathews, Suffolk, Surry, Smithfield, Newport News, Hampton , Poquoson, Gloucester or York County Virginia

Below is a breakdown of state and county taxes in the Williamsburg VA area. Please

Budweiser Military Tribute Extended by Anheuser-Busch InBev

 1/6/2009  Here’s to the Heroes” Provides Free Admission to Worlds of Discovery Theme Parks For Military Members and Direct Dependents

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (Jan. 6, 2009) – Well you can ‘t get a free beer anymore at Busch Gardens in Williamsburg. What you can get is free admission if you are an active duty  service person !

BGVA A tribute program that has provided free admission to Worlds of Discovery for more than 3.2 million members of U.S. and coalition armed forces and their families has been extended through 2009. Budweiser’s “Here’s to the Heroes” was launched in February 2005 to acknowledge the service of military men and women and the sacrifies made by their families.

“It is gratifying to all of us at Anheuser-Busch InBev that so many members of our armed forces have taken advantage of this program and honored us with a visit,” said Jim Atchison, President of Busch Entertainment Corporation (BEC). “This is a difficult time for our men and women in uniform- and their families- and we are honored to give them something back.”

About 700,000 guests either service members or their dependents, have received free admission to Busch Gardens in Williamsburg and Water Country USA through the Here’s to the Heroes program since it started in 2005.

Here’s to the Heroes provides a single day’s free admission to any one Busch Gardens or SeaWorld park, Water Country USA, Sesame Place or Adventure Island for the service member and as many as three of his or her direct dependents. The program is sponsored by Budweiser, the flagship beer of Anheuser-Busch InBev.

Any active duty, active reserve, ready reserve service member or National Guardsman is entitled to free admission under the program. he or she only need register, either online at www.herosalute.com or in the entrance plaza of a participating park, and show a Department of Defense photo ID. Also included in the offer are members of foreign military forces serving in the coalitions in Iraq or Afghanistan or attached to American units in the U.S. for training.

“This is one small way we can acknowledge and thank the soliders, sailors, Marines, airmen and Coast Guardsmen whose service helps to preserve the freedom and safety of every American,” Atchison said. “It’s important to all of us at Anheuser-Busch InBev that we show our gratitude to the men and women of our armed forces and their families for the sacrifices they make on our behalf.”

Here’s to the Heroes is the fourth tribute to military personnel offered by the company since Yellow Ribbon Summer welcomed service members home from the Gulf War in 1991.

Three Worlds of Discovery – SeaWorld Orlando, Busch Gardens Tampa and SeaWorld San Diego – operate year round. The company’s remaining parks are seasonal, with varying opening dates this spring. Each park’s operating schedule is available online.

Inactive, standby and retired reserve members, military retirees, U.S. Merchant Marine and civilian Department of Defence workers are ineligible for the program. The program does not include Discovery Cove or SeaWorld’s new waterpark, Aquatica.

Orlando-based Busch Entertainment operates nine Worlds of Discovery across the U.S.: SeaWorld Florida in Orlando, SeaWorld California in San Diego, SeaWorld Texas in San Antonio; Busch Gardens Africa in Tampa, Fl., Busch Gardens in Williamsburg, Va., Discovery Cove in Orlando; Sesame Place in Langhorne, PA. near Philadelphia; and waterparks Adventure Island in Tampa and Water Country USA in Williamsburg. Aquatica, SeaWorld’s waterpark, opened in spring 2008.

The Worlds of Discovery play host to more than 25 million guests each year and employ 26,000 people nationwide. On the Web at www.WorldsofDiscovery.com

Find out more about Busch Gardens Williamsburg here

John Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg and Hampton Roads, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real EstateContact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation , shopping or anything else about the area.

Click here to Search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, York, Gloucester, Charles City Virginia

Click here to search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Va Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth,Franklin, Sussex,

Williamsburg VA 2008 A Year In Review

From an article in the Va Gazette By Cortney Langley  Dec. 2008

The recession slowed the growth of housing and commerce for the first time in 10 years. Still, there was plenty left to propose and oppose.

James City County set out to revise the Comprehensive Plan with various forums and committees taking the public pulse.

A new slow-growth group called J4C produced research papers challenging various assumptions and projects. The outgoing Democratic majority tightened a James City ordinance to expand stream buffers to 300 feet instead of 100. The new Republican majority promptly unwound that and eventually compromised at 225 feet, then defeated the whole measure. The stream buffers were among many disputes in which four of the five members criticized each other as politically partisan. Almost 900 Ford’s Colony residents petitioned to block a big continuing care facility across the road as too big, generating too much traffic and burdening the HOA. They found a zoning loophole to support their case legally.

The HOA agreed not to sue when management backed down on applying full residential rights to those in a proposed senior care facility. Others still opposed the project on grounds of traffic and scale, even after it was scaled back from 944 units to 739. Despite a last-minute gimmick to stop it, the James City supervisors approved, but the financing dried up during the national credit crisis.

Also near Ford’s Colony, a plan for 240 workforce housing units on News Road was pulled back to weave it into the new Comp Plan. It was considered DOA after the continuing care controversy. Ford’s Colony announced Westport as 100 large homesites across Centerville Road but removed from the controversial continuing care facility.

Two-year assessments found York home values up an average of 15%. The Board of Supervisors reduced the real esate tax rate from 69.75 cents per $100 of assessed value to 65.75 cents.

York county administrator James McReynolds said he needed $26 million worth of expansion and new buildings for his various departments.

A new task force promised to have ideas on developing workforce housing by summer. Work languished, but the group plans to take up the mantle in 2009.

High Street scaled back 99 townhouses to 36 in the first phase as real estate sales continued soft. The Movie Tavern theater that was supposed to open by Labor Day was delayed to November, and then to March along with the retail shops. By year-end, two of five apartment buildings at High Street began to be occupied.

Two new sets of stoplights were erected for High Street, bringing the total in greater Williamsburg to 87. Yet very few were synchronized to keep traffic moving.

The Salvation Army set out on a feasibility study for a $6 million complex of teen center, child care, computer lab, food pantry and other services to the community. The site is on Richmond Road near 199.

An extended runway was ruled out at Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport, which seemed to scotch any federal subsidy for acquisition. By year-end, it was going to take more than $3 million to buy the airport or $16 million to rebuild elsewhere. Some citizens were adamantly against James City County putting up the money. The death of co-owner Jean Waltrip complicated matters.

Philip Morris completed the expansion and conversion of the Route 143 plant to make spit-free tobacco. 1,200 acres were put on the market by Williamsburg Pottery, though Kim Maloney clarified the business would remain intact. With no buyers at hand, the property was later taken off the market. Longtime farmer Don Hunt closed Hill Pleasant Farm. He had no plans to sell to developers but asked for the land-use designation to change to mixed-use with the Comp Plan update. The York supervisors compromised on requiring Kiln Creek Golf Club & Resort owner Dick Ashe to cut the grass of its abandoned nine-hole course.

Overcrowding worsened at Stonehouse Elementary, but a 9th school was still two years away.

Pockets of retail vacancies were showing up at Patriot Plaza and were persisting at Williamsburg Crossing.

A revised version of controversial condos were approved on South Henry Street despite criticism that they were out of scale.

Williamsburg Community Chapel spent $15 million to expand to 70,000 square feet with an auditorium for 1,500.

York denied its first mixed-use development of apartments and stores, on Route 17 at Battlefield Road. 10 four-story buildings for mixed use at Route 17 and Battle Road worried York residents as too massive.

The York supervisors were lobbied heavily to approve in a 3-2 vote a house on the Chesapeake Bay that was within the 100-foot Chesapeake Bay resource protection area.

The Honda dealership in Norge sought to expand, but neighbors complained of encroachment. Neighbors in Chisel Run protested Prime Outlets expanding across Olde Towne Road after two dozen older trees were cut down. James City had a raft of road projects, but the state budget was cut in half to $3.5 million. Two James City supervisors had second thoughts about approving a $50 million contract with Newport News Waterworks. It’s good for up to 5 million gallons a day. Water rates raised 12%- 15%, with more to come.

VDOT ramped up its traffic studies in ways that would cost developers more time and money, but slow-growth advocates hailed the move for reflecting a more cumulative impact.

J4C came up with six pages of ways to prevent flooding through improved draining. The crux of the problem was assigning responsibility for flooding after a development is built.

Three days of citizen meetings led to a vision of the Eastern State campus for mixed uses and housing around various mental health components. Sites emerged for at least one new school, an office park, apartments, “Geriatric Square” for research, and faculty housing.

Neighbors near Hubbard Lane protested expansion plans for a mini-warehouse behind James-York Plaza. The Planning Commission recommended denial of the proposal and the application has yet to go to the Board of Supervisors.

Seasons Trace sought a second road out of the subdivision in the event of hurricane flooding.

The city budget was ho-hum except for a 15% hike in water rates to pay Newport News Waterworks in times of need. Last year the rates went up 10% and more hikes are coming, in part to cover costs of the new King William Reservoir. Geologist Gerald Johnson lost his fight to save the last patch of 5-million-year-old fossils along the bluffs of the James River. Kingsmill wanted the site for more homes.

You know you’re from Williamsburg when…….

This was authored by Williamsburg VA resident Jill Carter it originally appeared in the VA Gazette and is now on Facebook. Just thought I would share.

YOU KNOW YOU’RE FROM WILLIAMSBURG WHEN:
1.You can get to the Williamsburg Regional Library…without using Rt. 60 or 199.
2.You were excited when Lowe’s opened.
3.You know who has right-of-way at Confusion Corner.
4.When you hear “It’s tourist season,” you automatically think to pull out your guns.
5.You know seven different ways to get to one place.
6.You know your way around William and Mary…but you’re not a student.
7.You see someone getting excited about pictures from Colonial Williamsburg, and you usually follow up with a story beginning with “I was there once with my friends…”
8.You have a sudden urge to back slap every little child you come across wearing colonial garb with tennis shoes.
9.Seeing someone dressed in colonial clothing at 7-11 or a grocery store no longer fazes you.
10.You know where the Amphitheatre is.
11.You use Kidsburg more as a teenager than you ever did while a child.
12.And it’s usually after dark.
13.You know where to find radioactive jellyfish.
14.Busch Gardens is a regular hangout place.
15.You know at least five people that work at Busch Gardens.
16.You drive past a historic landmark at least three times a day.
17.You make fun of said historic landmarks.
18.You visit the neglected corpses in Colonial Williamsburg.
19.You know who “Kennedy” is.
20.You have at least one friend who was born in Williamsburg.
21.Most of your graduating class is going to VA Tech, VCU, CNU, JMU, or William and Mary.
22.You don’t have to look at some one’s license plate to know that they’re a tourist. They just suck at driving.
23.You say “The Climbing Tree” and everyone knows what you’re talking about.
24.You’ve been swimming at College Creek, despite the radioactive waters.
25.You actually know where College Creek is.
26.You know where the signs on the Parkway switch from “Do Not Pass” to “Pass With Care.”
27.You can think of at least five bed-and-breakfasts off the top of your head.
28.You know that when people say “The Sunken Gardens,” they are actually referring to a rather large field with sidewalks.
29.You know what “LP” means.
30.And you don’t care.
31.You know where the “Four Minute Stoplight” is.
32.Everyone else in the country is excited about Jamestown 2007. You’re dreading it because you won’t be able to get out of your neighborhood.
33.You know the ferry schedule.
34.And you were happy when they FINALLY made it free!
35.Your friends find really cheap gas and call EVERYONE they know. Even people they haven’t talked to in at least six months.
36.You know where at least three thrift stores are. And none of them are run by the same organization.
37.You’re at PBK more than the college students are.
38.You know what PBK is.
39.Two of the most feared words in consecutive order: Grand Illumination.
40.You know about the free parking garage.
41.You know where “The Underground” is.
42.You know that “The Underground” and the free parking garage are the same place.
43.And you marvel at the fact that tourists are willing to pay $9 to park.
44.You remember when the Cheese Shop was not in Merchant’s Square.
45.You were sad when Baskin Robins and The Blue Talon burned.
46.You’re bloody pissed that the College Delly is turning into another damned Starbucks.
47.And you know that the new Starbucks will give the greater Williamsburg area 8 Starbucks total. And that pisses you off, too.
48.You know at least 4 Polish people and at least 5 Russians.
49.You know the double meaning behind the name of “Lafayette” High School.
50.You remember when Jamestown High did not exist.
51.You remember when 199 East did not exist.
52.The construction of 199 affected your family’s finances.
53.Your house could be considered a historic landmark.
54.The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation can make you repaint your house because “it’s not the right colour.”
55.You can’t remember the last time Lafayette High had a good JV Football team.
56.You know which of the middle schools used to be a high school.
57.You still don’t understand the school redistricting.
58.You’ve been busted by the William and Mary cops.
59.You know one of these people: Brian Ready or Jessica Harms.
60.You know who Mr. Snyder is. And you cringe in fear at the mention of his name.
61.You know where New Kent is.
62.You know three different ways to get to Newport News. And none of those ways involve 64 or 199.
63.You know how to pronounce the words “Chickahominy,” “Poquoson,” “Boutetourte,” and “Gloucester.”
64.You know who the Guinea Men are.
65.You remember BEFORE Wawa. And you were so happy when we finally got one!
66.You managed to live six months without a movie theatre.
67.You know what “Tommy Tech,” “CW,” and “The Burg” are.
68.You know EXACTLY what faults there are in Disney’s version of “Pocahontas.”
69.And you’ve practically smacked every little kid that asked where the waterfall was.
70.Mapquest got directions to your house wrong.
71.You don’t think Norfolk Airport should be considered an international airport just because it goes to Puerto Rico. After all, Puerto Rico is one of the United States’ territories.
72.You know what bars Colin Farrell frequented while filming “The New World.”
73.You hear “Hurricane Warning” and get excited because you’ll probably have at least three days off from school.
74.Noreasters don’t bother you anymore.
75.You know where the “Hurricane Evacuation Route” is, but you’ve never actually had to use it.
76.You’ve heard about the time that “Lafayette High School almost blew up.”
77.You most likely knew one of the people responsible for that.
78.You know what the real name of Confusion Corner is.
79.You hear that we have a really good chance of getting snow, and we never see a flake.
80.When we really do get snow, a half-inch will get us out of school for at least one day.
81.You can name over half the restaurant on Restaurant Row.
82.You know what Restaurant Row is.
83.You spent time in “learning cottages” during elementary, middle, or high school, or more than likely, all three.
84.You’ve memorized the layout of Busch Gardens (including a few shortcuts).
85.You wish Sno-to-Go was open year-round, despite freezing temperatures in the fall/winter.
86.You think Presidential Park was the biggest waste of any one’s money EVER.
87.Yet you still go there just to pretend to pick the Presidents’ noses.
88.You know at least two Fife and Drummers.
89.You freaked out the day Target came to town and immediately started calling it “tar-jay.”
90.You know where every single one of the five million pharmacies are.
91.And you can’t believe there was just another one added.
92.You remember how pissed off everyone over 40 was when they heard about Hooter’s being built, despite the fact that Hooters is in York County, not Williamsburg.
93.You know what “Rhino Poop” is.
94.You went to Jamestown High and could bet money on a bomb threat happening at least once a day.
95.You remember when New town was just the new Corner Pocket.
96.You remember when the Jewish Mother caught on fire.
97.You know that the Prime Outlets was first called Berkley Commons.
98.You no longer have to go to the Patrick Henry Mall for Old Navy or any other good shopping.
99.You don’t have to go on the ghost tour to know Matthew Whaley is haunted.
100.You remember when feeding the animals at Waller Mill Park was allowed
101.You still are friends with someone you knew in kindergarten.
102.You remember what life was like before Wal-Mart, but you still shop there.
103.The Pottery used to be the only mall in town.
104.You can’t go out without running into someone you know.
105.You know that DOG Street has nothing to do with furry pets.
106.If you remember were Roses used to be.
107.If you remember when the Outlet Mall had more than 5 shops open in it.
108.If you remember when The Pottery was actually halfway decent looking, and you still wonder to this day why it maintains its status as a tourist attraction.
109.You remember when the Last Word was filled for weeks with nothing but parents arguing about whether or not “Pimp and Ho” Parties are appropriate.
110.You were most likely at said “Pimp and Ho” Party.
111.You know that the Colonial Parkway has three lanes- one for each direction of traffic and one for passing.
112.And you laugh and swear at people who drive 30 mph while driving in the middle of the three lanes.
113.When vacationing you never understood why everyone doesn’t have amusement parks 5 minutes away.
114.You take a field trip the Living Museum every year K-8.
115.A little kid asks where Miko is, and you say that you saw him in several bloody pieces across the road.
116.Or that you ran him over on your way to work/school/home that day.
117.And then you laugh when they start to cry.
118.You’ve memorized when Quota Time starts, ends, and where the prime locations are for the Quota to be filled.
119.And yet you’ve still managed to be pulled over.
120.And it’s rather likely that you were pulled over a few days later, as well, for the same violation.
121.You’ve done the same stupid thing several times, and yet you still do it anyways because it provides some entertainment.
122.You would follow the ghost tours at night and try to scare the tourists.
123.You swam out to the sandbar at College Creek, even though you knew people had died from the undercurrent before.
124.You go to the College Delly more often than the William and Mary students do.
125.Everyone you meet was born somewhere else.
126.You claim you hate the Last Word, but it’s the first thing you read when you get the paper.
127.It takes you five minutes to get out of a parking space because no one will let you out.
128.When you go to IHOP at the late/early hours it takes you hours to get your food and often walk out before it gets to you.
129.You know at least two places were the speed limit is 8 or 18 mph.
130.You’ve been stuck behind an old person in a Buick going 30 on 199.
131.You know the fireworks have three locations and you know where to stand to see all three.
132.You know which three fireworks were mentioned.
133.You go to one school, but your friend, who lives on the other side of the street, goes to a different one.
134.Extra points if they go to another school system.
135.You know how to pronounce Toano.
136.You know not to go on the parkway at night.
137.You think it’s funny that people actually visit CW and Jamestown.
138.It’s normal to wait 30 minutes to an hour in line at sno to go… and it’s worth it
139.You know what CW, FC, WF, BG, and WC are… and you’ve been to them all at least 5 times
140.If you go to LHS… class color day is the most important day of the year.
141.And every year the administration says there won’t be another one because of how horrible the behavior was.
142.You know where you can find a speed limit of 12 3/4
143.You know how to get to Richmond without using 64
144.You can tell what neighborhood people live in by the sticker on their bumper.
145.Your high school student lot had nicer cars than the teacher lot.
146.You know what “The Pile of Poop” is.
147.And you’ve played mini-golf there several times.
147.You have trouble remembering what the real name to “The Pile of Poop” is.
148.You know where you can find the speed limit 23 1/2.
149.Every one you know has taken at least 1 AP Class
150.You can name at least five people who shouldn’t have
151.You go to Yorktown Beach in the winter
152.You get offended when people say “its not a real beach”
153.You can pick out historical inaccuracies in movies.
154.You’ll stop watching a movie because of the historical inaccuracies.
155.You argued over the historical accuracy of Elizabeth Swan’s wedding dress in Pirates of the Caribbean
156.You know that both Thomas Jefferson and Jon Stewart hate WM.
157.You own something that says William and Mary on it even though you have no intention of actually going there.
158.The only reason someone goes out of state for college is because they got accepted into an Ivy League.
159.You don’t care about the Wren cross but want them to put it back so that way everyone will shut up!
160.Over half the population of your town are college students.
161.You’re more scared of stubbing your toe on a brick than you are of getting mugged.
162. The weather man may say one thing, but what actually happens is a completely different story.
163.You know that once the light turns yellow, you can fit at least four more cars through before it turns red.
164.The light is orange, not red.
165.You’ve used that excuse in court.
166.In the summer, you wish it was colder, and in the winter you wish it was summer.
167.You know that Williamsburg was voted in the Top 5 Places to retire in 2006 by Money Magazine.
168.You swim in the James River, despite the riptide warnings and knowing that it’s radioactive.
169.You explode the radioactive jellyfish at College Creek.
170.You know the best places to get your boom-boom on at College Creek.
171.You’ve never actually used any of those places.
172.But you’ve seen someone else using them.
173.You’ve had at least one teacher that talked to him or herself.
174.And you’ve participated in his or her conversations with him or herself.
175.You’ve had at least one of the Crawfords.
176.You know that there’s nothing to do after 9pm.
177.And yet you still manage to get yourself in trouble with either a business owner or the police.
178.While in CW, you curb your appetite on the free peanuts and the Peanut Shop.
179.You’ve straddled Thomas Jefferson.
180.You’ve also burned yourself on him in the process of straddling him.
181.You bask in 86* and sunny weather at the beach, then wake up five days later with an inch and a half of snow on the ground…and it’s still snowing…in April.
182.You forget when the last time Haynes had a “Half off everything” day. Not because it was a long time ago, but because they have some sort of huge sale three times a week.
183.You’ve taken a random road trip and ended up in the depths of New Kent.
184.You felt fine about being in New Kent because you knew it wasn’t hard to get back home.
185.You’ve figured out which stoplights have real cameras at them.
186.You know which cars are undercover cops because our police force has problems with hiding all of the equipment.
187.You give someone three different times as to how long it’s going to be before you get somewhere: one if there’s traffic, one if it’s steady traffic, and one of there’s NO ONE on the road.
188.You can’t understand why it took so long for the county supervisors to figure out that a third high school was, in fact, needed…about five years ago.
189.You give directions not by road names, but by landmarks. Example: Turn left at the Crown, then go about a mile, then turn left in front of the IHOP. Go over the bridge. Hooters is the second building on the right.
190.You aren’t getting the day off from school for Jamestown 400th because the schools like you. Oh no. It’s because the Jamestown 400th is renting the school buses for tourist transportation.
191.You’ll drive all the way over to Surrey to get gas that’s only 10 cents cheaper. But you enjoy the ferry ride!
192.You’ve gotten lost while driving IN Williamsburg, and somehow ended up at the Ferry, or in either York, Yorktown, or Newport News. Extra points if you end up in the middle of New Kent…without even knowing you were in New Kent.
193.You’ve been stuck in the “Four Minute Stoplight” for an excess of 8 minutes. Extra points if you’ve been stuck for more than 11 minutes.
194.You’ve been at the “Four Minute Stoplight” in the middle of the night, with no one around, looked both ways, and if there was no traffic in your immediate vicinity, went through the red light.
195.You’ve done #194 at any red light.
196.You speed up when the light turns yellow just so that you don’t have to wait…even if you end up running a red light.
197.You laugh at the tourists that freak out at the sight of those little black snakes. You then proceed to go pick it up and carry it over to them.
198.You think you tripped over a branch? Oh no no no. That was one of those little black snakes.
199.You’ve resorted to some form of illegal activity to amuse yourself, yet you’ve never been arrested.
200.You’ve mastered the art of lying to the cops.
201.You’ve been pulled over multiple times for the same infraction within a one-week time period.
202.You’ve filled out the “Best of Williamsburg” although you were under the age of 18. You just put in your parent’s name. Or just made one up.
203.You know I-64 traffic patterns so well that you can exactly time your trips according to the check-in times to the houses and hotels in the Outer Banks.
204.50% or more of your neighborhood is made up of the elderly.
205.You’ve been pulled over for listening to your music “too loudly.”
206.You’ve done donuts in at least one of the school parking lots.
207.You’ve given a campus cop the finger.
208.Girls: The William and Mary men’s cross-country team has been the cause of many of your near-accidents.
209.You can tell a friend that you’re at the place with trees by the flag and they have a general idea where you are.
210.You drive by what used to be an empty lot, and now there’s a new building there. But you don’t remember the construction of it.
212.You heard the story about the guys jumping off of the big bridge in Busch gardens.
213.You remember when the same guys lit off fireworks in the Walsingham Academy girls’ locker room later, and got expelled.
214.Those guys are your heroes.
215.You laugh every time you see the donut tire-marks in the St. Bede’s parking lot.
216.You remember when New Town was a big, pretty field.
217.You hear the words “move-in day” and cringe.
218.You hear “parent’s weekend” and do the same.
219.You know the book-mobile schedule.
220.You laughed when you heard about the greenleafe giving food poisoning to My Chemical Romance and Muse, as well as a huge wedding, and then getting depressed when you realize that no band would ever come back.
221.You miss the old movie theater, if only for the DDR machine.
222.You’ve seen the graffiti near the old movie theater and it never fails to make you laugh.
223.You know to what school the “dancing pigs” refers to.
224.You know someone who’s gone there, and you laugh at their uniforms.
225.You know that Queen Anne dairy snack, even while looking like a deserted trucker stop, has the best ice cream, burgers, fries, and onion rings in all of the east coast.
225.You’re sure that if kingsmill were to succeed from the united states, it could easily support itself.
226.You remember how awesome the Ice Storm was.
227.You hear that your bus has a double run and you cry because not only will you not get home for another hour and a half, but you’ll also have to sit at least three to a seat.
228.You flash your lights at other drivers to warn them of hidden cop cars.
229.You have been pulled over on Jamestown Road for speeding.
230.You’ve been pulled over right where the speed limit turns from 45 to 25 on Monticello.
231.You remember getting two weeks off for Hurricane Isabel.
232.You remember going to school on Saturday to make up for all of the lost days of school.
233.You remember having to go to school for 30 minutes extra every day for two months because of Isabel.
234.You refer to the Wawa in CW as the Wee-Wawa. It’s smaller than the average Wawa, but dammit, it’s trying!
235.Verizon has just about created a mobile-phone monopoly.
236.Your family is watching Jeopardy and someone gets asked a question on CW or Jamestown and everyone in the room answers it out loud.
237.The new Arby’s being built, was the old Arby’s, and since then its been a string of failed sandwich shops and eateries.
238.You remember they tore down the Taco Bell to build another Taco Bell on Richmond Road
239.You remember the green 7-11
240.When driving 199 or 60, you pass at least three people you know.
241.You remember the day Fabio got hit by a goose, and probably laughed.
242.If you’re a college kid, you come home for break and see all of your old friends within the first three days, but not because you planned it that way.
243.When you see a picture or TV ad for Williamsburg, and the Fife & Drum are in it, you look for people you know.

 

FEEL FREE TO ADD YOUR OWN IN COMMENTS !

 

John Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg and Hampton Roads, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real EstateContact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation , shopping or anything else about the area.

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Williamsburg VA- Thomas Nelson Community College Opening New Campus

  The new Historic Triangle Campus at Opportunity Way begins a new era in the life of Thomas Nelson Community College and the communities we serve.

 

 In a region steeped in our nation’s history, Thomas Nelson Community College is proud to make its own history. The campus’s 120,000 square foot building is on nearly 74 acres of land at the Warhill site, strategically located next to Williamsburg-James City County’s newest high school.

 

 

The new campus will play a major role in providing quality education, serving the workforce development needs of businesses and industry, and helping individual citizens achieve their goals.

For more information, please call 757-253-4300 or visit us online at www.tncc.edu

 

John Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg and Hampton Roads, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real EstateContact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation , shopping or anything else about the area.

Click here to Search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, York, Gloucester, Charles City Virginia

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Williamsburg VA Real Estate Colonial Williamsburg Foundation to donate Conservation Easment to Williamsburg Land Conservancy

map of conservation area Williamsburg VA

map of conservation area Williamsburg VA

 

 John Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. ― The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation will donate a conservation easement to the Williamsburg Land Conservancy on 82 acres of land east of Route 132.  The easement will provide permanent viewshed protection for a three-quarter mile segment of highway between Queens Creek and Bypass Road.  Most of the property, 68 acres, is located in York County with a smaller portion, 14 acres, lying in the City of Williamsburg.

“In conjunction with the conservation easement on 230 acres across Route 132 previously granted to the Williamsburg Land Conservancy, this conservation easement will protect scenic views along both sides of the entry to Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Area from Interstate 64,” said Foundation President Colin G. Campbell.

Like the earlier easement, also donated to the Williamsburg Land Conservancy, this conservation easement will prohibit development of the property and preserve its predominantly wooded character.

“The Conservancy is excited to work once again with Colonial Williamsburg to protect a key scenic property,” said Tim Cleary, chairman of the Williamsburg Land Conservancy’s board of directors. “We commend the Foundation and its board for their commitment to conservation.” 

Caren Schumacher, executive Director of the Williamsburg Land Conservancy, noted that Route 132 is designated as a scenic entry corridor on both the City of Williamsburg and York County comprehensive plans.

The property, acquired by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in 1956, contains a mature deciduous forest and 25 acres of wetlands bordering Queens Creek and its tributaries.  An archaeological survey indicated evidence of historic and prehistoric archaeological resources on the property.

Founded in 1990, the Williamsburg Land Conservancy was the first private non-profit land trust in Virginia incorporated specifically to use the provisions of the Virginia Conservation Easement Act.  The conservancy is dedicated to protecting and preserving significant natural, scenic, agricultural and historic land in the James and York Rivers watersheds.  The conservancy strives to maintain the character and ambiance of the area through a combination of land preservation tools, education and advocacy programs, and shaping public policy.

This donation represents the second large easement donated to the Williamsburg Land Conservancy within the last 60 days.  In November, the group accepted a 190-acre conservation easement in upper James City County.  With the addition of the property east of Route 132, the Conservancy will protect a total of 3,300 acres in the Historic Triangle area.

Established in 1926, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is the not-for-profit educational institution that preserves and operates the restored 18th-century Revolutionary capital of Virginia.  Williamsburg is located 150 miles south of Washington, D.C., off Interstate 64. For more information or reservations, call toll-free 1-800-HISTORY or visit Colonial Williamsburg on the Internet at www.history.org. 

You can learn more about the Williamburg Land Conservancy Here

 Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real Estate

 This informational update provided by Mr Williamsburg.com/ John Womeldorf . A local Realtor assisting home buyers and sellers in the Hampton Roads and Williamsburg areas of Virginia.

Contact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation , shopping or anything else about the area.

Search Homes for Sale

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Williamsburg VA Real Estate Are there nice beaches near Williamsburg VA ?

John Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

We were in Williamsburg recently looking at homes for sale In driving around the Hampton Roads area we saw signs  for the Outer Banks.

Living very near the ocean now in MA. (a couple of blocks) and wanting to be close, we wondered if we moved to Williamsburg for retirement (which we are considering) where the nearest nice, un-built up ocean area is.

I know parts (I think) of the Outer Banks are still fairly quiet and not high-rise city – is that right? We’ve never been, but been to Bald Head Island, which we adored. That, however, isn’t suitable for a weekend trip, which we would hope to do often.

How far driving time to get to this part from Williamsburg?

 

It’s  about 2.5 hours to Duck a little further is Corolla and even Carova which is a beach community that only can be accessed by driving on the beach. Amazingly there are million dollar plus beach homes built in this area. The nearest store can be 8 miles down the beach !! Now that’s remote. As you drive down the beach you will sometimes see wild horses roaming free ( we have) 

 

Our personal favorite is Corolla. We go as often as we can. ( parents have a house there ) There are plans to build a bridge across the Currituck Sound which will shorten the drive to Corolla by about an hour !

Lots of different beaches in the Outer Banks depending on what you like. The further north or south you go the less commercial they are. Much further south there are Rodanthe, Waves, Hatteras ( almost 6 hours to Hatteras) and you can take the ferry to Ocracoke a neat little place to visit at the southern tip of the Outer Banks. No high rise buildings. simply beaches, some stores and a lot of protected wildlife areas..

 

Another much closer beach to consider visiting is Sandbridge in VA Beach, 70 miles from Williamsburg.Located 15 miles south of (and 180° opposite) the Resort Area, Sandbridge is a secluded beach hideaway of 5 miles of pristine sand dunes and dancing sea oats. It is a relaxing and peaceful community where you can truly slow down and unwind on your vacation. Beachside, the Atlantic never fails to entertain. And for those craving even more of the great outdoors, the marshes and open waters of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and False Cape State Park make for great kayaking, hiking, and fishing  It’s basically all beach houses. At The very end of Sandbridge is Little Island Park

Sandbridge Little Island Park has always been a great place to take the family. It has a playground for the kids, a fishing pier for the anglers, and a wonderful covered picnic area. This year it gets even better with a packed calendar of FREE events designed to bring a little taste of the resort area entertainment to the laid back attitude of Sandbridge.

It is located in Sandbridge Beach at 3820 Sandpiper Road. Amenities include basketball courts, concessions, fishing pier, picnic shelters, playground equipment, restrooms, surfing/swimming, tennis courts and volleyball courts.

  Beyond that is False Cape State Park a 4300 acre park with 6 miles of undeveloped beach along the Atlantic Ocean. You can only get there by walking or biking.

Her is their website : http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/fal.shtml

 This informational update provided by Mr Williamsburg.com/ John Womeldorf . A local Realtor assisting home buyers and sellers in the Hampton Roads and Williamsburg areas of Virginia.

Contact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation , shopping or anything else about the area.

Search Homes for Sale

Click here to search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Va Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth,Franklin, Sussex, Southhampton, Emporia, Greenville, Mathews, Suffolk, Surry, Smithfield, Newport News, Hampton , Poquoson, Gloucester or York County Virginia 

Its official Busch Gardens Williamsburg is opening for Christmas Season 2009

John Womeldorf is Mr. Williamsburg, sharing his thoughts, real estate expertise, and “all things Williamsburg” in an effort to spread the word that Williamsburg, Virginia is the greatest place on earth to live!

busch gardens williamsburgBusch Gardens Europe in Williamsburg VA has invited the media to the park for a special announcement today. Most are speculating that they will announce that the park will open for Christmas as the Busch Gardens in Tampa does. No clue yet if they will attempt to do it this year or 2009.  Seems very late to attempt an opening in 2008 but who knows.

The website Theme Park Insider reported Tuesday that Busch will make a major announcement on Thursday, and speculating that the news is “probably the long rumored Christmas festival.” Busch has invited media to the park for an announcement it says will show the park “in a whole new light.”

In any case look for the Christmas operating season to be announced. I’ve heard that they plan major decorations of the park and some rides will be open (including Griffon) but not all

My guess is some type of Christmas Light show and Christmas Festival as well as an opportunity to purchase a  season pass that is valid for a year/2 years. I would assume the Christmas festival will last during the month of December until after Christmas thru Jan 1. The season passes could be bought as gifts for Christmas. 

Whoops, Busch Gardens slipped. Listed under the Job Responsibilities for the Theatrical Services Operations Supervisor on Busch’s talent search site was the following bullet:

installs/strikes, HOS and Christmas Events.

  http://www.talentsearchbgw.com/theatricalservicesopsup.html  They have since edited the site….

Will update as soon as I know any further. Although the whole world will know for sure after the announcement !

So here’s the update:  

From the official press release:

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (Dec. 4, 2008) – Officials today announced plans for an all-new holiday event coming to the Virginia theme park in 2009. “Christmas Town: A Busch Gardens Celebration” will create the anticipation of the season and fill visitors’ senses with all things Christmas. The park will transform into a winter wonderland filled with holiday traditions, new surprises and park favorites that make everyone say, “Now this is Christmas.”

 

For the first time in the park’s 34 year history, visitors will experience all-new attractions, shows and shopping that will fill them with holiday spirit. Guests can look forward to an immersive experience amid more than a million twinkling lights while they explore the best holiday traditions from around the world. Santa Claus will visit the park each evening to hear Christmas wishes from the young and young at heart.

 

“We’ll kick off a season-long celebration for family and friends to gather for Christmas fun,” said John Reilly, Busch Gardens’ general manager and executive vice president. “Featuring live entertainment, great food and unique shopping experiences all under the glow of a million Christmas lights, Christmas Town will add a unique holiday tradition to Virginia.”

 

Christmas Town opens at Busch Gardens on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 4 – 9 p.m. beginning Nov. 27, 2009. The park will open each evening Dec. 18-27, 2009, excluding Christmas Day. Some sections of the park will remain closed for the season. Some rides and attractions are weather dependent.

 

     

Christmas Town admission tickets will be available for $19.95 beginning January 2009. Guests with active one-year and two-year Busch Gardens’ passes save 50 percent on Christmas Town tickets as well as free parking and in-park discounts.

 

 

 PLANNED EXPERIENCES at Busch Gardens Williamsburg Christmas Town

 Each section of the park will be themed in Christmas décor native to each country or hamlet, and will feature all new attractions, shows and shopping that will immerse guests into the Christmas season. Think of it as a European Christmas with an American flair. Christmas Town will feature:(weather dependent) , Corkscrew Hill and Curse of DarKastle

Special holiday-themed dining opportunities

Unique shopping experiences

Evening Santa Claus visits

Children’s shows

Strolling carolers

Tree-lighting ceremonies

Select rides, including *Griffon 

 ADMISSION

General admission price for non-pass holders: $19.95

Platinum, 2-Park and 1-Park Pass member prices: $9:95 + free parking and in-park savings on food and merchandise

Tickets go on sale in January and can be purchased at the gate or online at 

www.christmastown.com

.OPERATING SCHEDULE

Open evenings 4-9 p.m.

 

  

 This informational update provided by Mr Williamsburg.com/ John Womeldorf . A local Realtor assisting home buyers and sellers in the Hampton Roads and Williamsburg areas of Virginia.

Contact me at John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Research the area at www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com

Or ask any questions about homes, neighborhoods, schools, amenities, recreation , shopping or anything else about the area.

Search Homes for Sale

Click here to search all homes, town homes, condos and building lots for sale in Va Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth,Franklin, Sussex, Southhampton, Emporia, Greenville, Mathews, Suffolk, Surry, Smithfield, Newport News, Hampton , Poquoson, Gloucester or York County Virginia 

Busch Gardens Williamsburg VA Video Tours

 

If you are thinking of visiting Busch Gardens in  Williamsburg VA and want to get a feel for the park take a look at this video by David Olsen. It will help you appreciate how beautiful the park is. This was shot in 2006.

Here is another one that will give you a close up of the new Griffon Roller Coaster.

 

Anheuser Busch Execs reap almost $1 Billion in sale to Inbev

 

When Belgian brewer InBev completed its $52 billion purchase of Anheuser-Busch by paying $70 a share to stockholders there were quite a few executives who reaped huge rewards.

The takeover marked the end of the line for many senior Anheuser-Busch executives and all but one of its directors. But all walked away with big payouts for their company stock.

A group of 17 top executives received more than $1 billion for their shares, and the brewery’s 12 directors other than Chief Executive August Busch IV surrendered their posts Nov. 18 with a combined $23 million in hand.

Director and former chief executive August Busch III led the payday, collecting $427.3 million for his 1.3 percent stake in the company. About half of that amount comes from stock he controlled directly and through stock options, while the other half he controlled indirectly as the beneficiary of a couple of family trusts, through a charitable trust and through his wife, Virginia.

Busch III, 70, has been a member of the board since 1963 and served as chairman from 1977 until his retirement Nov. 30, 2006. He ran the business as CEO from 1975 to 2002 before handing the reins to Patrick Stokes.

Stokes, the company’s chairman, walked away with $160.9 million. About $10.7 million of that is controlled through a family limited partnership and a trust. Stokes, 65, spent his career with Anheuser-Busch and rose through the ranks to become the president and CEO of the company from 2002 until his retirement on Nov. 30, 2006. During Anheuser-Busch’s 156-year run as an independent company, Stokes was the only person outside the Busch family to hold the top post.

CEO August Busch IV collected nearly $91.4 million through the InBev buyout. The Fourth, as he is called, grew up in the beer business like his father, Busch III. He began working full time for the brewery after graduating from Saint Louis University in 1987. He held jobs in packaging, shipping and brewing and eventually earned his brewmaster’s degree from Versuchs und Lehranstalt für Brauerei, an international brewing academy in Berlin, Germany.

Busch IV, 43, made his mark as vice president of marketing during the late 1990s and early 2000s before rising to president of the brewery in 2002 and ultimately CEO of parent company Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. in December 2006.

Keith Kasen, chairman and CEO of theme park subsidiary Busch Entertainment Corp., made $16.2 million. He oversaw the subsidiary’s headquarters relocation to Orlando, Fla., earlier this year and ran the company’s nine SeaWorld, Busch Gardens, Discovery Cove, Sesame Place, Adventure Island, Water Country USA and Aquatica theme parks.

Michael Harding, president and CEO of Anheuser-Busch Packaging Group Inc., reaped $13.4 million.

Francine Katz, vice president of communications and consumer affairs, received $12.5 million. She has worked at Anheuser-Busch for two decades, leads a staff of 80 in corporate and public relations, and serves as the company’s lead spokeswoman. She was named one of the Business Journal’s Most Influential Business Women this year.

 

 Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real Estate

 This update brought to you by Mr Williamsburg.com

John@MrWilliamsburg.com

Williamsburg VA Bluegrass Concert ” FISH Benefit “

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008
Bluegrass Night – 8th Annual Fundraiser for FISH a Williamsburg VA Non Profit

 
  “‘Ever Who Shows Up” performs from 7-9.  Come early for an a la carte Southern style dinner 5-7 p.m.  Admission $5 and a can of food.  All proceeds support the local food bank – FISH
  

Concert will be held at The Corner Pocket in New Town/ Williamsburg VA

Who is FISH in Williamsburg VA ?

FISH is a local organization that helps families in times of emergencies. They have over 250 people that offer their services in a completely voluntary manner. FISH offers food, clothing and transportation to the less fortunate members of our community. A family or individual in need may receive once every 30 days a generous supply of dry and canned foods and infant formula, together with sanitation supplies. They may also receive throughout the year clothing and household goods such as bed sheets, towels and blankets. The organization has a well-stocked selection area and the volunteers work hard to make sure that everything that is handed out is in optimal condition.No child that visits the center will leave without a toy and a book. Transportation services are available to persons with medical appointments. Anyone in need of transportation must call three days in advance, although they will do their best to accommodate requests made with less than three days notice.

FISH can be contacted through the United Way Helpline (757-229-2222) or at 757-220-9379. If you cannot call and you need the food, you can go directly to FISH. To receive their services you will only need a picture ID, such as a driver’s license.

Corner Pocket/ New Town Website

A community update brought to you by Mr Williamsburg.com

Mr Williamsburg.com " Williamsburg VA. Real Estate

Williamsburg VA timeshares. An owners opinion…

Thinking of buying a timeshare in Willaimsburg VA ? You may want to read this editorial originally published in The VA Gazette ( Williamsburg VA) 

What wasn’t reported in the VA Gazette article about Williamsburg timeshares is the huge cost to unaware buyers. The process starts with hard-sell presentations, which can last many hours. Buyers are offered restaurant coupons and other gifts as incentives to stay with the process.  eautiful pictures of worldwide resorts are shown.

No mention is made that only a few units may be available. Timeshares are sold by the week and can cost more than $25,000. This up-front expense is just the tip of the iceberg. In order to exchange your property for another in a different location, you must join a broker club. This will cost about $100 per year. In addition, you will pay an exchange fee of $150 to $200 for each week you wish to exchange. On top of all this, the developer charges an annual maintenance fee of $600 to $800.

Do the math. It’s interesting to note that my timeshare, King’s Creek Plantation, recently lost its quality rating because of lack of maintenance and general disrepair. We King’s Creek owners have been cheated. The developer builds these units for $200,000 to $250,000, and then sells them for $20,000 times 50 weeks, obviously a tidy profit.

It gets worse! Last November I paid my 2008 maintenance fee and received no exchange due to a lack of availability. Last month I paid my 2009 maintenance fee. The developer advised me today that my request can’t be submitted to the broker because he is too busy.

In conclusion:

l. Owners have absolutely no input or say.

2. The president of King’s Creek will not speak to any owner. You must write him a letter.

3.  Timeshares resell for about 10 cents on the dollar. Tens of thousands are for sale at any given time. Some Realtors will assume your maintenance fee in exchange for the deed to your property.

4. The Gazette continually advertises hundreds of timeshares that are listed due to non-payment of maintenance fees or outright foreclosures.

5.  If you’re a buyer, I can make you a heck of a deal.

Richard E. Turnau

James City

 

 

 

InBev deal with Anheuser Busch has closed

Associated Press
© November 18, 2008

By AOIFE WHITE 

BRUSSELS, Belgium 

InBev SA on Tuesday formed the world’s largest brewer when it closed its $52 billion takeover of Anheuser-Busch Cos.

The new company, named Anheuser-Busch InBev, will be headed by InBev CEO Carlos Brito and will be headquartered at Leuven, Belgium.

InBev promises to keep Anheuser-Busch’s St. Louis base as the company’s North American headquarters. Anheuser-Busch President and CEO August A. Busch IV joins the new company’s board as a non-executive director.

The deal gives InBev a jewel of a brand in Budweiser – the world’s top selling beer – which it promises to sell more widely by pushing into emerging economies in Asia, Latin America and eastern Europe.

This will help generate growth as beer sales decline in North America and Europe where drinkers are cutting back and turning to wine and other drinks.

Brito said the combination had created “a stronger, more competitive global company with a leading international brand portfolio and distribution network, and great potential for growth all over the world.”

InBev said it now had all the regulatory clearances it needed for the deal. Last week it agreed to sell Labatts USA to win U.S. Department of Justice approval for the takeover.

U.S. antitrust officials had worried that beer prices would increase in upstate New York because the two companies would supply most of the beer in the region.

InBev did not say who would buy the U.S. unit. It will keep its Canadian subsidiary Labatts, which is one of the top beer brands in the country.

Anheuser-Busch provides half of America’s beer but it has not managed to expand around the world as fast as InBev – a Belgian-Brazilian hybrid that owns hundreds of local brands but few real stars.

Anheuser-Busch owns several properties in Virginia in the Williamsburg area. In addition to a brewery in Williamsburg, the company’s subsidiaries own the Busch Gardens theme park, the Kingsmill Resort and Spa, and the Water Country USA water park.

InBev has borrowed $45 billion to pay for the deal and secured $9.8 billion in equity bridge financing that it had planned to replace with a share issue in October.

But rocky financial markets forced it to postpone issuing new shares and it says it can keep the bridge financing in place for up to six months after it closes the deal.

Carlos Brito, Chief Executive of the newly combined global brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev, talks about the completion of the deal, the significance of today’s announcement and next steps.

Mr Brito also underscores the rationale of deal in spite of today’s current economic climate and highlights the new company’s strategic and brand priorities to secure its ambition of becoming “the best beer company in a better world”.
 
Talking frankly of the challenges to come, he said the business would have to work harder but added that its beer business was lean and resilient and that it had the talent and skills base to see them through tough times.
 
He said that the company and its board were working hard on both possible asset sales and its prospective rights issue.
“The equity issuance is something that the Board will decide on the best time to do it; we have a bridge of six months after closing to get it done. And for the disposals of $7bn we have a bridge of up to 12 months after closing.”
The interview and transcript are available now on http://w3.cantos.com/inbev.

Inbev Anheuser Busch Deal Approved BY DOJ

By Rusty Carter VA Gazette

The Department of Justice gave its blessing Friday to the union of InBev and Anheuser-Busch, with one prenuptial condition: InBev must sell Labatt USA.

The caveat was made in a civil antitrust lawsuit filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Washington aimed at blocking the original InBev-Busch deal. At the same time, the Justice Department filed a proposed settlement that would resolve the suit and other concerns about fair competition.

Here’s why divesture was important, according to PR Newswire. Budweiser and Labatt are the two biggest-selling beer brands in Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse, so allowing InBev to keep Labatt would have eliminated competition between Labatt USA and Anheuser-Busch. The Justice Department feared the result would be higher beer prices in all three markets.

“This divestiture will ensure that consumers will continue to benefit from the significant competition between the merging companies in upstate New York,” said Deborah A. Garza, deputy assistant attorney general of the Antitrust Division, in a statement.

In most U.S. markets, InBev beers account for less than 2% of sales and are largely non-competitive with Busch, which nearly dominates 50% of beer sales nationwide. The upstate New York markets are close to the Canadian border, and half of Labatt’s U.S. sales take place in Buffalo, Syracuse and Rochester.

InBev’s ancestor, Interbrew, used its 1995 purchase of Labatt as an inroad into the North American beer market, paying $2 billion for the company. Interbrew’s first attempt at a North American presence came in 1989 when it tried to acquire Stroh’s. Coors beat Interbrew to the deal, and during the next five years Interbrew bought up small brewers in several companies before landing Labatt.

Friday’s announcement came 48 hours after Anheuser-Busch shareholders voted in favor of InBev’s buyout offer. The deal is anticipated to close by year-end, assuming InBev gets the remaining regulatory approvals and comes up with $52 billion Shareholders expect to fare well, since InBev is offering $70 a share. Busch stock opened at $68 a share Friday and shot up to $69.26 before dropping to $68.50 by the close. 

 

Although InBev has pledged to keep all 12 of Busch’s North American breweries open, it plans to sell non-core assets, chiefly Busch Entertainment, perhaps before the deal closes.

There’s been no word on potential buyers, although London-based Blackstone Group, Dubai World, and Spain’s Parques Reunidos are considered likely suitors

 

Anheuser Busch Shareholders approve Inbev purchase.

By LAUREN SHEPHERD and EMILY FREDRIX 

Shareholders of Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. approved the $52 billion sale of the business to Belgium-based InBev SA on Wednesday, a deal that is set to create the world’s largest brewer.

The vote was the latest step necessary to form the company that will be known as Anheuser-Busch InBev and combine brands such as Bud Light and Budweiser with Stella Artois and Beck’s. The deal, reached in July, is expected to close by the end of the year. It is subject to regulatory approval in the U.S., Britain and China.

August A. Busch IV, Anheuser-Busch’s president and chief executive, said the decision to sell the nation’s largest brewer was a difficult one.

“Every alternative was considered,” he told shareholders at the meeting just outside of New York. “In the end, we all agreed the InBev proposal was in the best interest of you, the shareholders.”

The new company brings about the end of the more than 150 years of family rule of the St. Louis-based company, though the newly combined company’s North American headquarters will stay there. InBev has said it will keep open all 12 of Anheuser-Busch’s North American breweries.

Busch will move into a non-executive role, but will be on the new company’s board. He said he was excited about the future of the new company, especially expanding the brands worldwide, which he said helps in “fulfilling the global ambition of my family.”

Anheuser-Busch agreed this summer to accept the buyout from InBev worth $70 a share. The deal ended back-and-forth wrangling between the two sides, with Anheuser-Busch spurning InBev’s unsolicited offers at first, claiming they were bad for business and were an “illegal scheme” that threatened to defraud shareholders.

InBev shareholders approved the deal in September.

The sale price is a premium to Anheuser-Busch shareholders over the company’s current stock price. On Wednesday, its shares fell 51 cents to close at $66.33. InBev said last week it will not reduce or change its $70-a-share offer, even though Anheuser-Busch’s share price has dropped amid larger market turmoil.

The deal gives InBev a key inroad to the U.S. market, where Anheuser-Busch dominates with about a 50 percent share. InBev, meanwhile, has a small fraction. It also gives the company about one-fifth of the markets in China and Russia, two areas poised for growth.

InBev has said it wants to tap into Anheuser-Busch’s marketing power and make its top-selling Budweiser and Bud Light brands into global powerhouses like Coca-Cola or Pepsi.

Leadership for the new company has already been decided, pulling from executives within both companies. Luiz Fernando Edmond will lead North American operations, leaving his post as InBev’s president of Latin America North.

David A. Peacock, an Anheuser-Busch vice president, will become Anheuser-Busch president and oversee U.S. operations and management of the Budweiser and Bud Light brands.

In St. Louis and Williamsburg, VA, where the company and its heritage play a big role in the community, some residents were sad about the vote, even though they knew it had been coming. “I think people are having a hard time with it, because now it’s finalized,” said O’Brien, who works in the city and lives in the suburb of Florissant. “It’s like the grieving process, something we have to go through. There are certain things you’re proud of in your city – the Arch, the brewery, Busch Stadium. It seems to be a loss.”

Colonial Williamsburg Employee Layoff

 By Bill Geroux
Media General News Service

November 5, 2008

 

 

Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia’s most popular tourist attraction, announced plans today to lay off 140 of its roughly 3,000 employees because of slackening ticket sales, retail sales and visitation to its hotels and restaurants.

Another 140 jobs that are budgeted but currently unfilled will remain vacant, Cole G. Campbell, president and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, said in a written statement to all employees.

“Colonial Williamsburg has no alternative than to become a smaller and leaner organization,” Campbell wrote.

Even before the U.S. economy slipped into crisis eight weeks ago, Campbell said, Colonial Williamsburg was feeling the pinch of reduced visitation because of the mortgage crisis and rising energy prices.

He said the economic downturn appears likely to continue well into 2009.

“Given the current economic volatility, the pressures before us seem relentless and there remains considerable uncertainty as to when we can expect some relief.”

The foundation does not release visitation numbers until year’s end. Last year’s paid admission was 780,000, the third consecutive year of increases, foundation spokesman Tom Shrout said.

Shrout said the layoffs—which were announced to staff this morning—would be spread through the organization. He said they were tailored to try to minimize the impact on the tourist experience.

Shrout said Colonial Williamsburg will continue to schedule its full slate of tourist activities, including the Grand Illumination on Dec. 7.

Williamsburg, Yorktown, A Revolutionary Trip

Revolution

The delegates of the 5th Virginia Convention, meeting in Williamsburg, Wednesday, May 15, 1776, agreed unanimously to instruct Virginia’s representatives at the Continental Congress in Philadelphia to propose that the colonies declare themselves free and independent states absolved from all allegiance to, or dependence upon, the crown or parliament of Great Britain. Seven weeks later, the Declaration of Independence proclaimed why the colonies had chosen independence. In Williamsburg, the Convention’s delegates drafted a declaration of rights and a constitution for Virginia, creating a society in which the people, not the monarch, were sovereign.

The Revolution had to be won on the battlefield, however. War had broken out a year earlier with skirmishes between British troops and Massachusetts militia at Lexington and Concord. It would continue for six years before the decisive battle of Yorktown. There, in October 1781, American and French troops led by George Washington defeated a British army commanded by General Charles Lord Cornwallis.

Don’t Miss

  •  

    Yorktown Victory Center

    This museum of the American Revolution chronicles America’s struggle for independence from the beginnings of colonial unrest to the formation of the nation. A new Declaration of Independence Gallery emphasizes the dramatic impact and relevance of this historic document. Exhibits also provide eyewitness accounts of the war and describe the convergence of forces in October 1781 at the Siege of Yorktown. “The Legacy of Yorktown: Virginia Beckons” exhibit examines how people from different cultures shaped a society and incorporates the theme of creating a national government with the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Outdoors, historical interpreters engage visitors in demonstrations of everyday life during the Revolutionary era, in re-creations of a Continental Army encampment, and 1780s Tidewater Virginia farm.

    Visit: http://www.historyisfun.org

  •  

    Colonial Williamsburg

    Each day, the Historic Area features Revolutionary City, a dynamic two-hour event during which guests witness – and participate in – the “Collapse of the Royal Government, 1774-1776,” and the struggles of “Citizens at War, 1776-1781.” Other sites of importance during the Revolution include the Palace, where the last royal governor Lord Dunmore resided, the Magazine, from which British marines stole the colony’s powder in April 1775 fueling a crisis that led to war, and the Capitol, where the General Assembly passed the crucial legislation that created the state of Virginia.

    Visit: http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com

  •  

    Yorktown Battlefield

    When Prime Minister Frederick Lord North learned that Cornwallis had surrendered to Washington, he reputedly said, “Oh God, it’s all over.” It was. Guests can tour siege lines and fortifications, witness artillery demonstrations, and step into Washington’s tent.

    Visit: http://www.nps.gov/yonb/

Williamsburg/ James City County Schools ” Quality School District

Williamsburg, James City County , Virginia —An intensive three-day review of WJC Schools earned the division a ranking as a “quality school district.” WJC agreed to the review to gain

accreditation from the AdvancED Southern Association of Colleges &

Schools (SACS)/ Council on Accreditation & School

Improvement, which accredits more than 13,000 school districts

internationally. The process is strictly voluntary since Virginia has its

own accreditation system.

A team of eight educators from school districts across the nation performed the

review. The group interviewed more than 500 people, among them 267 teachers,

parents, community and business representatives, support staff, students administrators

and school board members.

SACS has four accreditation ratings. The ranking earned by WJC is the highest.

The report contains strengths, commendations, challenges and recommendations.

A “committed, collaborative and talented professional staff,” a well-defined

vision for the school division, and open honest communication among stakeholders

as some of WJC’s strengths.

Commendations included implementation of innovative programs to address student

needs and the development of a comprehensive data collection system.

The report recognizes that WJC faces many of the same challenges, like

funding and meeting the standards of No Child Left Behind,

that school divisions across the nation face. It also noted that

WJC has many of its own, including retaining quality teachers, supporting the

needs of transient population and continuing to provide both teachers and students

with up-to-date technological tools.

The review team recommended that WJC begin working on the creation of a

process to secure input from all its stakeholders, including students, and build

working relationships with the retirement comment to tap into that base of knowledge.

Team members also suggested that the division monitor its strategies to close

the achievement gap, but be careful to maintain expectations for all students and

ensure that no subgroup is passed over.

Williamsburg Winery Interview with Patrick Duffeler

From an article in VA Business  Belgium-born Patrick Duffeler didn’t move to Williamsburg by chance; he came with a purpose, to open a winery and a boutique hotel.

 Before his move,Patrick Duffeler had held senior executive positions in Europe with Philip Morris and other companies. “We picked up a love of wine when we were in Burgundy. We wanted to make a difference by concentrating on the content of the bottle, not the marketing,” he says “We liked the fact that winemaking is a collegial, old-fashioned industry.”

Duffeler purchased the 320-acre Wessex Hundred Farm in James City County in 1983 and planted his first crop of grapes two years later. The first wine produced in 1988, Governor’s White, won Williamsburg Winery its first award, a Gold Medal from the Virginia Governor’s Cup, just two weeks after its introduction. It remains the winery’s most popular wine.

Production has increased from 2,500 cases 20 years ago to more than 65,000 cases today. The winery’s 50-plus acres of vineyards produce six grape varieties, including Petite Verdot, Merlot and Cabernet Franc. Duffeler employs up to 70 people during peak season, June through October.

Since its inception, the winery has received more than 250 awards. Its Acte 12 Chardonnay was rated as “One of the Best Wines in the World” by Decanter Magazine’s World Wine Awards in 2007 and in 2008.

Along with the winery, Duffeler owns the Gabriel Archer Tavern and Wedmore Place, a European-style country estate hotel within walking distance of the winery. The hotel opened a year ago. “People want to have wonderful memories of their travels,” Duffeler says. “They want a place that is quaint and personal, like being in a home. That’s what we’ve created.”

Duffeler loves living in the Williamsburg area. “Williamsburg is the soul of America,” he muses. “When I walk the back streets in the winter I hear the echoes of 18th-century people. It’s exciting.”

The Historic Triangle area — Williamsburg, Jamestown and Yorktown — is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the country. Attractions include the Jamestown Settlement, Yorktown Victory Center and Colonial Williamsburg, the restored 18th-century capital of Virginia.

The Williamsburg region includes James City County, which is home to Busch Gardens Europe and Water Country U.S.A. The area boasts well-known golf courses at Colonial Williamsburg and the Kingsmill Resort & Spa. 

Williamsburg, Virginia  economy

Retail, tourism and education are the main economic drivers in Williamsburg. Colonial Williamsburg tops the list of employers with 3,500 employees, followed by the College of William & Mary with 2,200. James City County, which surrounds Williamsburg on three sides, has a diversified economy that ranges from manufacturing and distribution to retail and tourism. The county’s largest private employer is Busch Gardens with approximately 6,000 seasonal and full-time employees. Anheuser-Busch Brewery has more than 800 employees. Busch Properties, which includes the Kingsmill Resort & Spa, employs 900. Other major companies include AVID Medical, which sells custom procedure trays for the health-care community, the Wal-Mart Import Distribution Center and Prime Outlets, one of the most profitable outlets in terms of sales and customer volume in the United States.

Where to stay
Duffeler designed Wedmore Place based on ideas picked up in his travels. Each of the hotel’s 28 rooms is named after a province in Europe and is decorated to reflect the region. “The rooms have been influenced by my background and travel experiences,” he says. “My wife is French, and we wanted to convey the differences between different cultures. We have 15th-century to 19th-century themes, from rustic to sumptuous.” Colonial Williamsburg offers Williamsburg Inn, a stately property known for its customer service, and 28 Colonial houses scattered among shops, taverns and gardens along Duke of Gloucester Street. For golfers, The Kingsmill Resort & Spa is an elegant but comfortable getaway.

Where to eat

Duffeler offers visitors two dining options — the Gabriel Archer Tavern, open for lunch daily and dinner on Thursday through Monday, and The Café Provencal, open daily for lunch and dinner, in Wedmore Place. The café specializes in upscale Mediterranean fare. Look for entrees such as pumpkin ravioli and prawn linguini. When he’s not frequenting his own establishments, Duffeler enjoys a night out at the Fat Canary, a lively bistro known for its creative entrees and service, and Blue Talon, a small bistro that describes its selections as “serious comfort food” —Virginia pork loin, meat loaf and gourmet mac and cheese. For steaks and seafood, many locals head to Opus 9 Steakhouse in the New Town area of Williamsburg.Ast FActs about Williamsburg Winery in Williamsburg VA

  • Virginia’s largest winery.
  • Pruduction over 60,000 cases of wine a year (that’s 720,000 bottles!)
  • Open everyday except on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.
  • The Williamsburg Winery was established in 1985 by the Duffeler family.
  • First wine was the Governor’s White. Released in 1988, it is now the most popular Virginia wine sold in the state.
  • Most of the names on our wines have historical significance. Click here for more.
  • The winery is styled like an Old World Village on 50+ acres.
  • Tours are offered daily and reserve tours are available. Click here for more.
  • The facilities are used for functions and events for up to 200 people. Click here for more.
  • The Gabriel Archer Tavern was featured in “The New York Times.”
  • Lunch is served daily 11am-4pm.
  • Dinner is served Thurs-Mon 6-9pm.

Williamsburg Winery Website

Wedmore Place Website

William and Mary Tribe Football, Williamsburg, VA

After earning consecutive road victories at then-No. 4 New Hampshire and Delaware during the past two weekends, the William and Mary football team has earned a No. 23 national ranking in the
latest FCS Coaches Poll and Sports Network FCS Poll. It marks the first time
the Tribe has garnered a national ranking since the 2005 season.

Having won four of its last five games, W&M currently owns a 4-2 record
overall and a 2-1 mark in conference play. In addition to its victories
against UNH and UD, the College has also defeated Virginia Military
Institute and Norfolk State. The Tribe¹s lone FCS loss was against
Villanova, which is currently ranked among the top 10 in both national
polls.

The Tribe boasts one of the country¹s most productive offenses and currently
ranks 16th nationally in total offense (424.0 ypg) and 17th in scoring
offense (35.17 ppg). W&M¹s defensive unit has also been outstanding and
currently ranks 23rd nationally in total defense (314.17 ypg) and 13th in
pass defense (152.67 ypg).

W&M will look to extend its two-game winning streak when it hosts Rhode
Island for homecoming on Saturday at 1 p.m.

What is a Blog ? Williamsburg/ Hampton Roads Virginia Real Estate

Question :Who the heck is Mr Williamsburg ? I have searched for properties many times and this name keeps popping up.

Answer: Mr Williamsburg is my alter ego. I am John Womeldorf dba www.MrWilliamsburg.com  A native of Virginia now living in the Williamsburg/ James City County area of Virginia. I am a local Realtor working with Liz Moore and Associates in New Town Williamsburg VA ,  who with my family have fallen in love with our very special community, and now  make my living helping others experience the same good fortune.  Because I live and work in town, and have kids in school here, I can answer just about any question you can ask!  In the course of my work I have answered  thousands of questions about the area. I have created a Website / Blog/ Journal/ Digest  ( you pick the best description) with a search-able field where you can find answers to a lot of the questions that I have been asked.   www.WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com is the site

 Surprisingly quite a few of the Questions about Williamsburg and Hampton Roads VA are not real estate related. Some of the questions asked by others include: What type of cultural scene is there in Williamsburg ? What about nightlife in Williamsburg ? I heard Williamsburg is all older people ? What about the Schools in Williamsburg ? What about recreation/ gyms ? Do you have any parks in Williamsburg ? Are there any private Schools in Williamsburg ? Where can I find employment postings for Williamsburg or Hampton Roads ? What restaurants are good ? What about activities for kids ? Sports for Kids ? Private Schools in Williamsburg or Hampton Roads ? Where are some good areas to fish ? What about shopping in Williamsburg ? What’s the best grocery store ? Where is the Mall in Williamsburg ? ( What you don’t have a Mall ? Perfect ! ) Where is the Trader Joes ? Where is the Whole Foods in Williamsburg ( Not Yet ) Costco ? ( not yet ) Where do you run in Williamsburg/ Hampton Roads Va ? Where are some good places to mountain bike, cycle in Williamsburg ? Where’s the Hospital ? Doctors offices ?  What about veterinarians/ animal hospitals ? Do you know a good mortgage company, title company lawyer in Williamsburg/ Hampton Roads VA  ? Where is the Movie Theater ? Museums ? What’s a Good Neighbor Pass ? What are the local newspapers ? Are there any 55+ Active Adult communities in Williamsburg or Hampton Roads VA ? Where do people work in Williamsburg ? What industries are here ? What are the good Golf Courses in Williamsburg ?  Where are the new home developments being built in Williamsburg ? What are they going to build ? What communities are there in Williamsburg that have swimming pools ? Tennis ? gated ? 55+ active adult ? waterfront ? have Marinas ? Where are the condo town home developments in Williamsburg VA ? What is New Town Like ?What is the BAH Allowance for the area ? Where is the nearest commissary ?What’s the closest Airport ? IS there a train station in Williamsburg VA ? Are there buses in town ? What about High Street ? What’s the story with Stonehouse ? Which is better Ford’s Colony , Governors Land, Stonehouse or Kingsmill ? ( answer, It’s personal what appeals to you may not appeal to others I will explain the differences if asked ) Where is Viniterra ? How far is it from Stonehouse to the nearest shopping ? Where is the nearest marina ? Can I keep a sailboat there ? are any builders building Green Homes there ? Who are the best new home builders ? Are any of the builders in financial trouble ? Do you have the tax information rates for the area ? Why don’t some of the listings have pictures ? Why don’t some of the listings have more pictures ? What does AS IS mean ? What does REO mean ? How about Short Sale ? Do you have any video movies of the area ? Do you list houses ? How do you market homes you have listed ?  Is there any place to play Pool ? Is there a bakery in town ? Should I buy Title Insurance ? What have homes in Williamsburg and Hampton Roads Virginia  been selling for ? Any Horse Stables in Williamsburg ? We want to buy a house but we are in Europe, Japan, Germany, Guam, can you help us ? I saw a home on another website but can’t find it anywhere else ? What social clubs are there for adults ? Can I still get a mortgage in Williamsburg VA ? Isn’t Williamsburg Va full of older people ? Whats the average discount from list prices that sellers have been accepting in Williamsburg and Hampton Roads  Va  AS you can see the list goes on and on.. I may have already answered the questions you have on your mind. To find out  Put a topic in  the upper right search area   and see.If you don’t see an answer simply email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or call 757 254 8136. I use a phone that allows me to respond to emails quickly. If you don’t hear back within a few hours try again or call . Our email filters sometimes block valid emails.

I understand that many Internet home searchers start their hunt many months or years in advance, and are just in the research stage.  I respect that, and I’m here to help…as much or as little as you would like.

 Are you planning a visit to the area any time soon?  I would be happy to recommend some places to stay, or to give you a quick, introductory tour of some neighborhoods and/or homes.

 Or, if you would like to get a feel for our market, I would be happy to set you up to receive e-mail notices of new listings in a price range or area that interests you.  I can also send you sold info, so you can see what sellers in today’s market are willing to negotiate.

 

 

Holiday Concerts December 2009 Colonial Williamsburg Virginia

One of the first question I get asked by clients who are thinking of moving to Williamsburg VA is “What is there to do in Williamsburg ? Are there any concerts or cultural events ? ”  Here is just a sampling of holiday music programs offered by Colonial Wiliamsburg in the upcoming 2009 Christmas Season.  Note that if you live here and have a ” Good Neighbor Pass” a lot of these concerts are free !

The list includes all of the following holiday musical programs  being offered in Colonial Williamsburg this 2009 Holiday Season:

  • Raise a Ruckus. Carson Hudson and his friends explore American folk music and the instruments that Americans have played over the last 400 years. Presented in conjunction with the “Cross Rhythms” exhibition, various folk instruments will be demonstrated with anecdotes and stories. 1:30 and 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 28 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Tickets are $6.
  • Christmas Hymns You Thought You Knew. Join John Turner and Michael Monaco in a festive beginning to the holiday season, as they take a fresh look at familiar carols and hymns from Christmases past. Sing familiar words and sometimes unfamiliar tunes accompanied by a variety of instruments including the harpsichord. The concert begins at 4 p.m. on Thursdays, Dec. 4, 11 and 18 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Tickets are $6.
  • Profound Joy. Multi-instrumentalist Timothy Seaman celebrates the great wonder of the holiday season with early American, old European and new compositions from his recording of the same name. Winter, Christmas and Hanukkah themes are heard in the glowing drama of the extended-range hammer dulcimer and the awe-filled sounds of the low whistle, bamboo flute, mountain dulcimer and psaltery. This hour-long program is held at 4 p.m. on Fridays, Dec. 5, 12 and 19 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $6.
  • A Grand Illumination Celebration. Timothy Seaman’s Virginia Sky joins The Three Jolly Coachmen for a stupendous serving of upbeat seasonal musical fare. Together they blend striking Celtic melodies on harp, whistles and hammered dulcimer with guitar, banjo, bass and singing in the lively tradition of The Kingston Trio. The unprecedented and colorful family event kicks off Grand Illumination at noon, 2 and 4 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 7 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Tickets are $10.
  • A String Band Christmas. The Runaway String Band plays a mix of holiday songs and instrumentals from the hills of Appalachia to the sidewalks of New York. String bands in the 1920s-30s played a wide variety of popular songs and tunes. The Runaway String Band continues the tradition of the Virginia string bands, presenting hot instrumentals, three and four-part harmonies and a selection of traditional holiday music and stories from the early 20th century. 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 8 and Sunday, Dec. 28 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $8.
  • Sticks, Strings and Songs. Join Lee Welch, Lance Pedigo and Wayne Hill for holiday music performed on a variety of percussion and string instruments. Enjoy contemporary and traditional settings of holiday favorites in this unique musical offering. 1:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 13 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $6.
  • A Baroque Christmas. A student ensemble from the College of William and Mary performs Christmas and chamber works of Bach, Handel, Corelli, Vivaldi and others. The ensemble consists of Nick Fitzgerald on baroque violin, Rachael Blake on baroque flute, Jon Brvenik on cello and Alice Real on harpsichord. This hour-long concert begins at 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 14 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $7.
  • A Williamsburg Christmas. Join Trio String Wind—Ardie Boggs, Tim Seaman and Phillip Skeens—for a heartfelt and compelling blend of seasonal music ranging from Celtic through classical with hammered dulcimer, flutes, Celtic harp, guitar, whistles and bodhran. 1:30 and 4 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 21 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $9.
  • An Acoustic Christmas. Beautiful instrumental arrangements of your favorite Christmas tunes performed on hammered dulcimer and classical guitar by the Miller Rowe Consort from South Carolina. The hour-long program begins at 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 29 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $10.
    Fiddling Away the Holidays. Master fiddler John Turner keeps a Colonial Williamsburg Christmas tradition by singing, playing and reveling in the lighter side of the holiday season. Included is the not-to-be-missed Twelve Days of Christmas as only John and his eclectic collection of whistles and instruments can provide. The hour-long program begins at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Dec. 2, 9 and 16.
  • Seller of Songs. Stephen Christoff explores early American music both seasonal and year-round, telling the story of Americans and their struggle for freedom from the 18th century and beyond. Guests will experience both familiar and unfamiliar instruments: the musical saw, octave mandolin, comb and paper, hand-flute, Jew’s harp, spoons and hand-bone. The hour-long program begins at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, Dec. 3, 10 and 17 the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $6.
  • Here We Come a Wassailing. Join Lee Welch and Barry Trott for traditional tunes and tales that celebrate winter and the spirit of the colonial holiday season. Customs and carols abound in good-humored and high-spirited music, sung and performed on a variety of stringed, wind and percussion instruments. The one-hour program begins at 1:30 p.m. on Dec. 6 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $6.
  • Christmas with the Colonial Singers. Enjoy a Christmas concert of songs, legends and the memories of the Christmas traditions in colonial America. The hour-long program begins at 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 20 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $7.
  • Charting the Holidays. Experience seasonal music from the days of Colonial America. Discover the origins of popular traditions as settlers arrived from the British Isles and Europe, bringing their music and customs to the Colonies. Join Lee Welch, Sarah Glosson and Barry Trott in this engaging holiday show at 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 22 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $8.
  • Colonial and Traditional Music of the Christmas Season. A lively mixture of carols and old wassailing tunes with colonial songs and dance melodies all performed on appropriate period instruments. Musicians and music historians David and Ginger Hildebrand provide commentary between selections to set the scene and illuminate the cultural context of 18th-century music in America. 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 26 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $8.
  • Christmas Music from the Jefferson Collection. Enjoy sonatas, ballads and songs from the musical collection of Thomas Jefferson sung and performed on violin, cello and guitar and narrated by Thomas Jefferson. Join Bill Barker, Lee Welch and Sarah Glosson for the music that Thomas Jefferson collected, played and enjoyed in his travels here and abroad. The hour-long program begins at 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 30 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Tickets are $10.
  • Whoop and Holler. Musical historian and performer Carson Hudson explores the history of the Virginia banjo from the 18th century to today. Hear music played on reproduction banjos. This hour-long program begins at 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 2.
    European musical holiday traditions are highlighted in the following Colonial Williamsburg programs:
  • St. Andrew’s Day Museum Social. Scottish fiddling master John Turner teams up with singer-guitarist Cliff Williams and fellow Scottish fiddler David Gardener to create a fitting musical tribute on this day honoring Scotland’s patron saint. After the concert, enjoy Scottish-inspired treats in the museum’s café and music throughout the museum. 6 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 30 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Tickets are $25 by November 22, $20 for Good Neighbors by Nov. 22 and $30 when purchased Nov 23-30.
  • Celtic Whispers and the Nativity. Join Ardie Boggs on the Celtic Harp, as she travels through the misty space of time, from Ireland to the Holy Land, tracing the Pagan conversion to Christianity. The concert begins at 4 p.m. on Mondays, Dec. 1 and 15 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $6.
  • Artisan’s Celtic Wonderland. The trio Artisan—Ardie Boggs, Timothy Seaman and Anne Robinson—brings unique Celtic and seasonal music on two magnificent Celtic harps and virtuosic hammered dulcimers, flutes, whistles and psalteries. Delighting guests with the beautiful holiday sounds of joy and peace, this hour-long program begins at 1:30 and 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 23 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $9.
  • A European Yuletide. The Virginia Sky Trio—Timothy Seaman, Ann Robinson and Peter Budnikas—celebrates the Christmas sounds of the Europeans who settled America. Enjoy charming and vibrant interpretations performed on hammered dulcimers, Celtic harp, guitar, Highland bagpipes and flutes. 1:30 and 4 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 27 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $9.
  • Hogmanay: Scottish New Year’s Celebration. Prepare for the beginning of 2009 with John Turner, Cliff Williams and David Gardner, three of Williamsburg’s most talented musicians, as they celebrate Hogmanay with songs and tunes from Scotland. The hour-long program begins at 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 31 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum—Hennage Auditorium. Ticket price is $9.
    A Colonial Williamsburg admissions ticket, Good Neighbor Card or museums ticket provides access to enjoy these musical programs. A separate ticket is required where indicated.

    Entrance to the museums is through the Public Hospital of 1773 at 326 W. Francis St. Operating hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. For information and reservations call (757) 220-7724. Programs and exhibitions at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum are supported by the DeWitt Wallace Endowment Fund.

    For reservations and more information, call 1-800-HISTORY. or www.History.org

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