• psst … I’m a Realtor! Thanks for stopping by my website. I would love to help you find your dream home and community in the Hampton Roads or Williamsburg area or to sell your existing home. This website is authored by local resident and REALTOR, John Womeldorf. John is known around town as Mr. Williamsburg, for both his extensive knowledge of Hampton Roads and the historic triangle, and his expertise in the local real estate market. His websites, WilliamsburgsRealEstate.com and Mr Williamsburg.com were created as a resource for folks who are exploring a move to Williamsburg, VA , Hampton Roads VA and the surrounding areas of the Virginia Peninsula. On his website you can search homes for sale , foreclosures, 55+ active adult communities, condos and town homes , land and commercial property for sale in Williamsburg, Yorktown, New Kent, Poquoson, and Gloucester, VA as well as surrounding markets of Carrolton, Chesapeake,Gloucester, Hampton, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Mathews, Newport News Norfolk, Poquoson, Smithfield, , Suffolk, Surry, Va Beach, Yorktown and York County Virginia You can reach John by email John@MrWilliamsburg.com or phone @ 757-254-813

Social Clubs at Fords Colony Williamsburg VA

Questions : Can you tell me what clubs or social activities they have for residents of Fords Colony in Williamsburg VA ?

Answer: Here is a full list of all of the current clubs that are open to Fords Colony Residents/ Homeowners in Williamsburg , VA

 

Ahoy Mates – Sailing Club
Every Wednesday and Sunday at 3pm (2pm in the winter) we sail our “POND BOATS,” weather permitting. The pond is called Chisel Run where there is a waterfall and wooden bridge. It’s on Williamsburg West Drive near the exit to Longhill Road. Bring your radio controlled sailboat, or come to observe. See what it is all about. If you would like to build your own boat, members have much expertise to help you.
Auto Enthusiasts
If you enjoy automobiles (antique, new, or something in between) then perhaps the Colony Auto Enthusiasts is the club for you. You do not need to own an antique or classic car to belong—half of our members do, the others don’t. All you need is an interest in cars and an hour’s worth of free time a month (perhaps more when we take a trip to a nearby location that’s sponsoring a car show or other vehicle related event). During the past year, for example, we visited the Ferrari exhibit at Norfolk’s Chrysler Museum of Art, were visited by a group of Model A Club members (with their cars), and took several day trips to “show off” members’ cars. We meet the first Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P. M. at the Swim & Tennis Club. 
Bid Whist
Bid Whist Players meet every second Thursday of the month at the Swim & Tennis Club at 7:30pm with the exception of July and August. All are welcome.
Monday Morning Bridge
Players meet each Monday morning at the Swim & Tennis Club from 9:30a.m. till noon. There are four progressions of six hands each of party bridge. There are usually between seven and ten tables. Players alternate volunteering as host/hostess. 

No dues required.

Duplicate Bridge
The Duplicate Bridge group meets every Wednesday at noon at the Swim & Tennis Club. This is a very friendly, easy to play in duplicate bridge group. It is not necessary to come with a partner—just show up and the director will always find a partner for you. For those who already belong to the ACBL, this is a sanctioned group, so you can earn master points while having fun and meeting many of your Ford’s Colony neighbors.
Bowling
More than 165 men and women participate in a league comprised of two divisions. The American Division bowls on Monday afternoons and the National Division bowls on Tuesday afternoons. Substitutes bowl whenever needed. The season is from late October through the end of March with an awards banquet in April.

Bowling fees and dues are required.

Fit For Life & Aerobics
Fit for Life is an exercise program of movements that will help improve flexibility and circulation to all parts of the body. It will also increase awareness of how your own particular body functions. Fit for Life is for men and women of all ages, no matter what the level of physical fitness. As the body ages, exercise becomes more critical to keep it strong and flexible.

Low impact aerobics is a combination of endurance, flexibility and muscular strengthening movements to enhance aerobic capacity providing an increase in your cardiovascular system and stimulating muscular function to supply and process oxygen. This program is designed for seniors and can be achieved by the majority of participants.

Caring Neighbors
“Caring Neighbors” of Ford’s Colony was formed to:

Act as a source of information on local services available for: health care – ER, extended and therapy, in home services– nursing, cleaning and meals, equipment rental – wheel chairs, crutches, walkers, etc.

Help to organize and provide limited assistance to residents in times of temporary health problems, medical emergencies, or death in the family with respect to: transportation, visitation, a meal, if needed.

Set up lists of items owned by residents who are willing to lend items to others having a short-term need – for themselves or visitors. Items include: medical aids, roll away beds or cots, baby/toddler equipment (gates, high chairs, strollers, playpens, toys, bikes, etc.)

Caring Neighbors continues to help our friends and neighbors in every way possible to provide that extra bit of “TLC” that each of us needs from time to time. Please remember that we are standing by—ready and willing to help.

Our community is growing very rapidly. In order for our committee to work more effectively, we ask for your assistance in letting us know if there is a problem or need in your neighborhood. Please make that phone call so we may help.

We are very proud of the Caring Neighbors program. It our wish that it continue to expand so it may better serve the community of Ford’s Colony.

There are no dues.

Computer Club
Ford’s Colony Computer Users Group (FCCUG)

Membership: All Ford’s Colony residents and property owners. We welcome newcomers and young residents.

Mission: To improve our members’ knowledge, skills, and enjoyment of personal computers through information presentations, discussion, learning, and sharing of common interests.

Focus: Software applications, tools & techniques, computer security, operating systems, performance, the Internet, networking, multimedia, digital photography, computer accessories, and emerging technologies.

Plans: Our plan for the 2004 season is to expand member services to include computer course offering designed specifically for members, and to establish a Lending Library.

Meetings: Third Monday every month, except July and August, at the Swim & Tennis Club.

Typical meetings begin with a brief overview of club business, a Show & Tell session which demonstrates a new product or technique, a technical Tip of the Month, followed by a Main Topic, presented by an expert, (see Focus, above). A Hospitality Committee provides refreshments..

Craft Club
The craft club supports numerous charities in the area. Members meet weekly enjoying the camaraderie of the group while honing their own craft skills and learning new techniques from others. Frequently, members work on charitable projects, such as quilting, knitting, crocheting and making items for special occasions throughout the year for nursing homes and other community groups. Often, club members offer to teach special skills, like decorative painting, beading, watercolor, basket making, sewing and specialty needlework to other members.

This club meets weekly from 1-4 P.M. The club accepts donations of materials and yarn for projects made for charity. 

The club has supported the following charitable organizations in the past: Sentara/Williamsburg Hospital, Catholic charities, local nursing homes, VA hospital – Hampton, Avalon, Premie Unit MCV. Some of the items made and donated include quilts, afghans, lap blankets, crocheted blankets and hats for premature babies, woolen hats and scarves, and stuffed animals for children awaiting emergency care.

Dinner Etcetera
Membership is open to all residents. Participation involves getting together on a quarterly basis at different homes for dinner to meet new friends and share a pleasant evening. You may attend once or as often as you would like. When you see an announcement in the Talk of the Colony, just call and sign up. We have a dinner in the autumn, late winter and mid-spring. The club has a final get-together in early summer. Attendance varies for each function.
Garden Club
With about 150 members participating at regular scheduled meetings from September through June, the club makes arrangements for guest speakers, demonstrations, tours and special events. The club is proud to have the largest membership in the Virginia Federation of Garden Clubs. Discussions concerning indoor/outdoor planting, flower arranging and related activities are highlighted.
Hospitality
Members of this committee extend a warm welcome to new Ford’s Colony residents. This greeting is also offered to property owners in transit and living in Williamsburg.

Members distribute a welcome package, which includes maps, discount coupons, health information and other promotional materials. Hosts and hostesses try to answer any questions newcomers may have concerning Ford’s Colony and the Williamsburg area while they make new residents feel welcome and comfortable in our community. New volunteers are always welcome and needed. Call the chair to offer your time and talents as a host or hostess to welcome new residents.

Newcomers
The purpose of Newcomers Club is to provide a means for newcomers to Ford’s Colony, both singles and couples, to get acquainted on a informal basis and learn about the many activities offered in and around the community. Each month, newcomers sponsors numerous activities designed to expand your group of friends and knowledge of the area.

The Newcomers meeting, listed in the Talk of the Colony, is usually held on the 3rd Friday of each month at 6:45pm at the Swim & Tennis Club. This is a time to socialize and sign-up for activities that are planned throughout the month and to hear an entertaining guest speaker. In December and June, special potluck dinner meetings provide a special festive atmosphere.

Pinochle

The Pinochle Club meets once a month on the fourth Friday. We meet at the Swim & Tennis club at 7:30pm. We play partnership Pinochle, single deck alternating partners after four hands of play.

The rules of play are available for anyone interested in joining. We are a group of players who relax and have fun with the game.

Swim Team
The Swim Team is open to all residents children, age 5 to 18, and all swimming abilities. Practices start after Memorial Day, after school, Monday—Friday. Once school breaks, practice switches to mornings by age groups. Our meets are competitive but our mission is fitness, stroke technique, community spirit, goal setting in a fun and friendly environment. Team membership has ranged from 90 –125 children. A coach and assistant coaches provide the proper attention and training for all levels. The season consists of six dual meets and a championship meet in June and July.

Relay carnival, B Meets, and mini-meets for those not yet swimming championship times round out our season. It is an action packed two months, but accommodations are made for summer school, work, family vacations and other activities.

The swim team board meets at the Swim & Tennis Club on the first Sunday of each month (normally February-November) at 4pm. Meetings are announced in the Talk of the Colony.

Fundraising includes dues, an adult party in the Fall and Spring. Concessions offer dinner and snacks at home swim meets and on weekends from noon –2pm. Residents are encouraged to participate in the fundraising events and home meets to support the community swim team.

Model Railroad Club
If you are interested in trains then you may want to participate in the Model Railroad Club. It does not matter if you have a sophisticated train layout or your train is still in the boxes, this group covers a broad range of model railroading interests. The Club usually meets at 7pm on the fourth Thursday every month at the Swim & Tennis Club.
Fly Fishing Club
Meetings are the third Tuesday every month at 7pm at the Swim & Tennis Club, with exceptions in July, August & December. This group welcomes beginners as well as seasoned anglers. Fish stories are the order of business, as is the planning of group outings, both in– and out-of-state. No dues.
Solitaires
The “Solitaires” is a group in Ford’s Colony which includes any single people living here. It is a great way to meet other singles, make friends, and enjoy activities together. We meet once a month for a dinner, day trip, game night, etc. The monthly event is announced in the Talk of the Colony. Planning meetings are held every other month. Come join us for some great get-togethers!
Tennis Club
The purpose of the Tennis Club is to encourage and facilitate tennis activities among Ford’s Colony residents of all ages and abilities.

Tennis is a healthful, recreational activity that can be engaged in by individuals throughout their lifetime. Playing tennis develops fitness, fosters competitive spirit and promotes friendships.

Daily leagues are promoted for men and women’s doubles play for Club members throughout the year by preparation of schedules using the Club’s specialty software.

The Tennis Club sponsors social mixed doubles Round Robin play followed by dinner for its members at least twice a year.

The Tennis Club encourages and promotes junior tennis by facilitating lessons and play activity in the summer months.

The Tennis Club also serves as an advocate for tennis matters for all residents, as well as members of the Club, through its contributions to the monthly newsletter, its participation in the Activities Committee and by maintaining a relationship with the Ford’s Colony Property Owner Management.

Tai Chi
The Ford’s Colony Tai Chi Club was begun in September of 2001. It consists of beginning and intermediate classes taught by resident/instructor Helen Davis with occasional visits from guest instructors.

Tai Chi is a gentle exercise routine that can be learned by anyone at any age. It involves a series of slow, graceful movements combined with concentrated breath control. It is known to improve strength, balance and flexibility, reduce stress and control blood pressure. No particular skills, equipment or clothing are required.

Classes are held at the Swim & Tennis Club, September through May. Beginners meet on Mondays at 2:30pm and Intermediates on Thursdays at 5:00pm.

Theater Club
The Ford’s Colony Theater Club is composed of amateur actors, singers, musicians and stage hands living here in Ford’s Colony.

The Theater Club provides periodic entertainment in instrumental, vocal, dance, dramatic and comedy presentations for all Ford’s Colony residents and guests; traditionally there is no admission fee except for the major production of the year. Performers may be club members or guest talent, although members are encouraged to develop their own productions. Group rates are also arranged for local plays.

This group has a great deal of fun and heartily welcomes anyone interested.

Players meet the second Tuesday every month at the Swim & Tennis Club at 7:30pm.

Friends & Neighbors Club
Club meetings feature entertaining speakers followed by a social hour. Meeting old friends, making new ones and seeing our neighbors is what Friends and Neighbors is all about. Every third meeting will be a completely social meeting designed to increase your enjoyment in living in Ford’s Colony.

We are the Colony’s fastest growing club because our members want to have fun, learn about new things and meet old and new friends.

Trailblazers
A nature trail within Ford’s Colony was first proposed in the early 90’s by interested residents to allow them to hike in remote areas of the “Colony” while conserving and enjoying its natural resources. Several potential sites were identified, with the wetlands/greenspace running from John Pott and Edinburgh to Westbury Park being selected as most suitable. In the late 90’s intensified interest led to including proposals for building a nature trail and a bird observation station in the 2001 Long Range Plan.

Resident enthusiasm for these projects led to dozens of volunteers completing the planning and construction phase. They blazed the trail; built bridges, walkways, bulletin boards, benches and bike racks; spread wood chips; and placed signs identifying trees, bushes, vines and wild flowers. Generous companies donated telephone poles, railroad ties and treated lumber. A proffer to James City County, in the area of environmental support, lead Realtec to provide manpower and financial assistance for construction. The Ford’s Colony Homeowners Association now supports maintenance and enhancement activities on these community assets.

Trailblazers, officially approved as an Activities Committee Club in August 1999, grew from those volunteers who participated in building the Nature Trail. There are now over 110 members. The Club’s mission is to maintain and enhance the Ford’s Colony Nature Trail; to provide opportunities for trail recreation, environmental education and interpretation; and to protect endangered species. Monthly meetings, open to all, feature wildlife biologists, forestry experts, bird enthusiasts, horticulturists, and environmentalists. Club members also share their expertise, lead trips to other trails in the area, and continue to supply the workforce to maintain and enhance our trail.

Travel Club
Over 500 Ford’s Colony residents participate in activities of the Travel Club. The Club conducts trips of interest to its membership, including dinner theaters, concerts and plays and visits to local historical sites. These include both day and overnight trips. Upcoming events are listed each month in the Talk of the Colony. Meetings are held on the fourth Tuesday of each month, except during the summer.

At meetings members share travel information and experiences through slides, videos, and discussions. Meetings are held at the Swim & Tennis Club, beginning with a social gathering at 7:00pm. All residents are welcome.

William & Mary Fan Club
The W & M Fan Club arranges for Ford’s Colony residents to purchase season tickets for football games at reduced prices. Before each game, fan Club members gather for a tailgate party adjacent to the William & Mary Hall parking lot…. A great way to meet new people. Fan Club members are assigned seats in the same area, so we have our own cheering section. Each year, in the spring, we have a “kick-off meeting” at the Swim & Tennis Club to meet the coaches, hear their comments about the prospects for the upcoming year and take orders for season tickets. This is the Club’s only meeting for the year.

No dues are required and you don’t have to be an alumni to join. What a great organization!

Wine & Dine
Wine & Dine groups have been organized for the enjoyment of the entire Ford’s Colony community. A Wine & Dine group is generally composed of 16-18 people. Each month, one person or couple host hor d’oeuvers and wine for an hour at their home, after which the group goes to dinner at a restaurant chosen by the host couple. The groups are organized each January, giving all the opportunity to meet and socialize with a wide variety of neighbors.

Each Fall there are announcements in the Talk of the Colony about whom to call to get included. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this great opportunity to meet and mingle with neighbors with whom you might not otherwise have contact since our community has grown so large.

Youth Activities
The Youth Activities committee is made up of a small group of parents in Ford’s Colony. Our group holds fundraisers (the Chili Cook-off, the Adult Halloween costume party and Luau) to help raise funds for Children’s events. We also plan and organize events for the children. We have previously run the Children’s Christmas party, Fourth of July parade, Halloween party and Easter brunch.

We also work with the Swim Team board on the End of Summer/ Back to School party and the adult Luau.

We are always looking for new parents in the community who would like to help with adult socials and children’s events.

Williamsburg VA

In an effort to boost Williamsburg VA tourism The Greater Williamsburg VA Chamber of Commerce is  running a series of radio ads in the Washington  DC area urging listeners to visit a newly created website www.WilliamsburgWeekEnds.com  the website will promote the Top Ten Reasons to visit Williamsburg, VIrginia.

The top ten reasons  mostly special events, will  change from one weekend to the next.  The radio ad campaign in the DC will continue through October 31, 2008. 

In addition to a listing of the top 10 reasons to visit the area, www.WilliamsburgWeekEnds.com includes a suggested  vacation idea planner for the Williamsburg VA area, an email sign-up for Williamsburg, VA weekend events and offers, and details on the Williamsburg VA Value Card.

The Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance and its wonderful members are happy to offer you a number of special discounts on area products – from admission tickets to hot dogs!  Unlike many discount cards, the Williamsburg Value Card IS transferable and will be honored through the end of 2008.  You can discover all of the discounts at Williamsburg area retailers, restaraunts, golf and other establishments by clicking here  The Value Card for Williamsburg VA provides discount opportunities to both tourism and non-tourism destinations. The Value Cards is available at all area Chesapeake Bank locations the New Kent Rest Area on I64, Area Timeshares and the The Chamber Office at  Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance office located at
421 North Boundary Street Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-3495
 
So… enjoy your visit to America’s Historic Triangle ( Williamsburg/ Jamestown/ Yorktown) and while you’re here, take advantage of the many special discount offers using your free Williamsburg Value Card!

Queens Lake Williamsburg Va Real Estate

Queens Lake is a wonderful, established waterfront community located in the York County part of Williamsburg, Virginia area. Bordered by Queens Creek to the North and West, and the Colonial Parkway to the South.  Its Eastern border is York Counties New Quarter Park, a 545-acre county park renovated in 2005. Most of the homes were built from the late 1950’s until the lates 1970’s. There are a few that have been built since 2000 on the few remaining lots left in Queens Lake in Williamsburg VA. 

 

 The Queens Lake Community offer a host of amenities to it’s volunteer members . They include  a  fresh water lake stretching for more than a mile, perfect for boating (electric motors only) and filled with large mouth bass, bream and other fish  A Marina on Queens Creek with  navigable access to the York River and the Chesapeake Bay. Two swimming pools   ( one boasts a six lane, zero degree entry facility equipped with diving board, jets and fountains. Another pool (for adults) and bathhouse complete the facility. The pool complex has a stunning view of the community marina and Queen Creek. Three tennis courts.  A Playing field with softball diamond. Volleyball Court (sand-filled ) Playground,  Clubhouse (sized to accommodate large major social gatherings with a  large function room and a fully-appointed kitchen for preparing and warming foods. Coffee makers, freezers and refrigerators are provided as well. 

 

Click this link to     Search all homes for sale in Queens Lake, York County, Williamsburg Va 

 
Here are a few homes sales statstics for home sales and home listings within the Queens Lake Neighborhood, York County Williamsburg Virginia:
There are 10 homes currently for sale in Queens Lake The prices for currently listed homes in Queens Lake range from $291,000 to $1,130,000. Sold home prices ion Queenslake averaged $367,000 in the last 12 months and ranged from $265,000 to $525,000. There are 3 under contract at this time. The average days on market time for the homes that sol din Queens Lake was an amazingly low 65 days.  

  

 

The following history is sourced from the Queens Lake Community website which you can explore here: http://www.queenslake.net/

 A short History Of Queens Lake, Williamsburg VA and the Association

The land bordering Queens Creek in York County Williamsburg VA is characterized by ravines; creeks; mature, mostly deciduous, woodland; and wetlands. It is easy to imagine the Powhatan Tribe hunting and fishing in this region and watching the European Colonists rowing their boats up and down the creek to Capitol Landing to access the new town of Williamsburg.  It has witnessed defining moments in American History, being close to the route that Washington took on his march to Yorktown in 1782, and being at the end of the defensive line that Confederate General Magruder constructed in 1862 to oppose Union General McClellan in the Civil War.  The remains of confederate trenches can still be seen in New Quarter Park and numerous artifacts (arrowheads, military buttons, and musket balls) have been found to bear witness to all of this history.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, there were a number of small holdings scattered throughout the region.  The foundations of a house can be seen close to Queens Creek in New Quarter Park, there was a farmhouse on the bluff that now overlooks the marina, old brick chimneys were found in the Montague Circle area, and there was a farm house on what is now Cambridge Lane.  The land is not well suited for farming, however, and it must have been difficult to eke out a living and also pay property taxes.  The Government took over much of the land along the south shore of the York River, including what is now Camp Peary, New Quarter Park, Cheatham Annex and the Naval Weapons Station.  Between 1925 and 1929, the Chesapeake Corporation, a timbering and paper mill operation based at West Point, purchased three tracts of land south of Queens Creek, known as the Roberts tract, the Hubbard tract, and the Holcomb tract, totaling 814 acres.  In 1927-28 it built the dam across the stream emptying into Queens Creek.  This created a 58 acre lake, that it called Lake Chesapeake. It stocked the lake with bream, bass, and crappie and used the entire property as a hunting and fishing preserve for its executives.  The existing farm house near the dam served as a lodge and was maintained by a caretaker.  In the early 1930s, the Federal Park Service built the Colonial parkway as a reconstruction project after the great depression.  This cut off some of the property but provided access to the road to the dam.

The Queens Lake Development Corporation

In 1950, the Chesapeake Corporation decided to sell off its preserve and it put the sale in the hands of Richard C. Benschoten, a local “Land and Estate” Broker.  Mr. Benschoten, an avid fisherman himself, saw the potential of the land around the lake for home sites so he interested four other businessmen in going in with him on purchasing part of the Chesapeake property.  They incorporated the Queens Lake Development Company on March 14, 1952, purchased 636 acres, including the lake for a total of $75,000 and renamed the lake “Queens Lake.”  After cutting and selling pines and selected hardwoods to recoup half their investment, the Company platted some of the area that was suitable for development with the help of Vincent McManus, a surveyor and vice mayor of Williamsburg; provided for basic road access, electricity, and water; and set about selling the lots. Queens Lake was not developed all at one time, but rather in sections.  As lots were sold in one section, a new section would be opened.  The first section that was developed included the property fronting the west side of the lake. This was followed by the creek front lots near the dam.  Two Williamsburg families and the President of William and Mary, who wanted an “out of town” home, were the first property owners.  There are 19 sections (some being divided into subsections). By the time the Development Company dissolved in 1987, there were 547 lots. Potable water was a problem because the region lies on a thick layer of impervious clay so wells to tap into the water table had to be over 400 ft deep; thus, a contract was negotiated with the Sydnor Pump and Well Company of Richmond to drill two community wells, construct pump houses (adjacent to 210 West Queens Drive and 112 Montague Circle) and lay pipe to serve each lot. Since sewage was not available, each lot had to accommodate a septic field.

In 1961, Mr. Benschoten’s real estate and insurance business partner, Jim Carter, and two bankers bought out one of the owners’ interest in the Queens Lake Development Company.  Shortly afterwards the Company purchased property at the end of East Queens Drive, and what was to become Sherwood and Allendale. Recognizing the value of waterfront lots, it hired Henry Branscome to build the dam to form Princess Pond.

Naming some of the roads after characters and places in the Robin Hood legend was the idea of Stanley Abbott, Superintendent of the Colonial National Historical Park who had been hired to help plan the roads and lots in 1961.  At that time he also laid out a master plan for the recreation area. The National Park Service owned a road called the North Collector Road that paralleled the Parkway.  In 1963 Mr. Abbott, arranged for the Park Service to make the collection road open to all public traffic, pending assumption of maintenance by the Virginia Department of Highways.  That road was officially named Lakeshead Drive. 

In the early part of the1960’s, over the objection of the Company and Queens Lake residents, Interstate Highway 64 was constructed through part of the property, leaving 33 acres cut off from the southwest corner.  In 1965, the company sold the 21 acres of this portion west of West Queens Drive to York County for the construction of Queens Lake Middle School.  As part of this deal, the County agreed to negotiate with the City of Williamsburg to provide water to the Queens Lake Development, connecting to the water pipes already installed by Sydnor. The wells were subsequently blocked off and the pump houses demolished.

When Dick Benschoten died in 1965, Jim Carter was hired by the Company to manage the development of Queens Lake.

The Queens Lake Community Association

From the beginning, Mr. Benschoten had in mind a community with the lake and other recreational amenities being available to all residents and eventually to be managed by the residents.  Accordingly, the “Queens Lake Club” was incorporated on July 7, 1952 with the charter “To regulate and perpetuate the use of facilities provided by the Queens Lake Development Corporation ….”  This was apparently modeled on a similar arrangement at “Smoke Rise,” a residential community in New Jersey.  Mr. Benschoten became president and remained so until his death in 1965. The sales contract for purchase of a lot from the Company required that the new owner must be accepted as a member of the Queens Lake Club. Resident dues were set at $10 per annum.  Standing committees for membership, building, finance and lake were established.  At a special meeting of the Queens Lake Development Company on June 29, 1953, it agreed to deed the lake and surrounding land up to 2 feet above the high water mark to the Queens Lake Club, Inc.  Shares of stock were issued to the partners of the Company on the basis of available acreage, with a share being issued to each new property owner as it was subtracted from the holdings of the partners. In this way, ownership of the assets of the club gradually transferred to the residents. In 1960 the Company deeded 11 acres of land on the east side of the dam to the Club and contributed $60,000 for recreational purposes including the construction of a swimming pool, two tennis courts, dock, and bathhouse.  The first swimming pool was opened in 1961.  Fees for its use were set at $50 per family.

In 1966, membership dues were $12 per year. Swimming fees were $65 for resident and $75 for non-resident families. In 1968, 200 families lived in the community and 143 lots remained to be sold.  Jim Carter negotiated the purchase of the 54 acre Holloway tract (Bowstring, Shoreham, Cambridge, and Holloway) for $3,000 per acre. Because half the tract was still in open fields, Carter planted hundreds of pine seedlings to provide an eventual wooded cover in keeping with the rest of the neighborhood.  There was some resistance to including residents of this area in the Queens Lake Club, partly because of perceived overcrowding of the existing swimming pool.  The Development Company offered to provide 30% of the cost of constructing a second pool in return for admitting this tract into the community and the members of the Queens Lake Club agreed.

In February 1969, Major General Briard Johnson was elected the first president of the Club who was not a principal of the Development Corporation. He was a strong proponent of the philosophy that individual amenities of the club (Pool, tennis courts, marina) should “pay for themselves.”  The initiation fee was raised to $160 for new lot purchasers. Swimming fees were $75 for resident and $110 for non-resident families. The second pool opened on May 30, 1969.  The By-Laws were revised to provide for one share of stock for initiation fees paid. All previous stock was cancelled and a new issuance of stock certificates was made.

Over the years the Club maintained the two pools and bathhouse, expanded the original two tennis courts to four, enlarged the marina from a landing on the creek to the present configuration of outside and covered slips as well as a launching ramp, and in 1980 constructed a clubhouse. In 2001, the original pool overlooking the creek was demolished and a new six-lane pool was constructed.

One of the original standing committees was the “Building Committee” which was to ensure that construction and subsequent modification of houses conformed to certain standards.  As an example, minimum living space areas were established for single and multiple story houses.  Conformance to the standards was enforced under threat of loss of privileges.  Over time, new construction dwindled, and the Building Committee ceased to exist as a standing committee.  The By-Laws provide for the appointment of a Building Committee if an occasion demands it.

Jim Carter sold the last lot owned by the Queens Lake Development Company in 1985 and he vacated his seat on the Queens Lake Club Board of Directors in 1986. The Queens Lake Development Company was dissolved on September 1, 1987.

Since the early 1960’s, one Saturday each year has been set aside as “Queens Lake Day.” Since the bicentennial in 1976 it has been held close to the 4th of July. Typically, there is breakfast in the clubhouse and the festivities are started by a parade along East Queens Drive to the recreation area led by the County Sheriff and followed by fire and ladder trucks, sirens blaring.  Most years there is a theme, and the marchers and bicyclists dress accordingly.  Scouts raise the flag and the QLCA President makes a welcoming speech. The rest of the day is devoted to sports events, friendly competitions, and children’s games.  In the evening there is a community picnic around the pool and dancing to a live combo.

A periodic newsletter providing updates on community activities and issues of concern to residents has been published since the early 1970’s. In addition, the club house has been used for hundreds of community functions, social events, and educational activities.

Over the years the Club has represented the residents of Queens Lake in a number of controversial issues, including: a proposal to construct high-density housing on a portion of the property; a proposal to construct a highway crossing of the York River adjacent to Queens Lake; a proposal to develop a golf course in New Quarter Park; noise abatement along the I-64 corridor; repair of the road across the dam following storm damage; and, more recently, upgrade of electric and water supply, and installation of a county sewage system.

In 1995, the Board decided to contract for a Facilities Condition Survey and a plan to maintain and improve Queens Lake Facilities over the next 10 years. The survey was conducted by the DeYoung-Johnson Group, Inc and addressed the clubhouse, pools, marina, and tennis courts. The resulting report, referred to as the DJG report, projected expected expenses for the ten year period.  It noted that the main swimming pool had deteriorated and was in need of extensive repair. On the basis of this report, the Association voted to increase maintenance dues to provide for expected expenditures.  In the spring of 1997, a survey of members was conducted to ascertain the interest in maintaining the swimming pool complex and later that year the DJG prepared a report outlining three options for it.  In 2000 the membership voted for the option to replace the pool and agreed to borrow some of the money required to do so rather than use reserve funds set aside for other purposes. The dues were raised by $100 per year to cover this expense.

In 2002, under its then president, Don Tortorice, a new class of membership was proposed.  In return for signing a restriction on their deed, binding them and all successive owners of their property to membership in the Club, the owners of a Queens Lake property could join with only a nominal stock purchase fee and be charged reduced maintenance dues (Whereas a “traditional member” paid $1,000 stock purchase fee upon joining and $310 per year in dues, a “deeded member” would pay $100 stock purchase fee and $250 maintenance dues.)  The Board pledged that they would not file any of the deed restriction documents until 130 had been received.  This number was surpassed in 2003, and the deed restriction documents were filed.  This duel class system is still in effect and appears to be working quite well. The dues have been constant under this arrangement for four years. Currently, out of 347 members, 190 are “deeded.”  Under the deed restriction program, the association retains 100% of owners of “deeded” properties, so this will gradually raise the overall retention rate and provide a solid base of permanent members to maintain the common property. 

At the annual meeting of 2003, the name, “Queens Lake Club, Inc.,” was changed to the “Queens Lake Community Association, Inc.” in order to emphasize its role as a guardian of the common property and representative of the residents — and to avoid the connotation that it was merely a social organization. The articles of incorporation were changed to reflect the new name in early 2004.

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Moving/Retiring to Willamsburg VA For young and old alike !

I wanted to share an excellent post by by Andrew Petkofsky for Virginia Business. I have added a few links to direct you to areas of information.

Ken Carr retired to Williamsburg because he didn’t want to get away from it all. As a sales and marketing executive in the fashion industry, he had enjoyed a fast-paced career and was looking for a gentler climate than his home in the Chicago suburbs.

But nice weather and recreational options were only part of it: Carr also hoped for opportunities to keep busy and take on new challenges. “You spend your life working, as many of us have, five or six days a week with the pulse of business,” he says. “To just have that stop, psychologically, I didn’t find that it was all that appealing.”

When Carr moved with his wife, Nancy, to the gated community of Ford’s Colony in 1999, he immediately occupied himself building a retirement house. Someone asked if he would sell it, so he built another.

Then he became increasingly involved sharing his business experience with those just starting out. Carr connects with business clients through the Service Corps of Retired Executives, a national program coordinated locally through the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance. “It’s a great way to use the expertise that you have,” says Carr, who is 65. “It’s also an incredible opportunity for businesses or organizations to get people who are very accomplished to assist them — the kind of team that quite frankly they couldn’t go out and hire.”

In fact, so many former executives and high-ranking military officers have retired to Williamsburg that a number of other organizations, including the College of William & Mary and its Mason School of Business have created local programs to harness their expertise.

The post-career challenges are not reserved solely for former captains of industry. Other retirees in the area take classes in a large continuing education program, teach in the same program and even help operate a professional chamber orchestra in Williamsburg. “We wind up with some very bright early retirees who still want to make contributions,” says Keith Taylor, director of James City County’s office of economic development.

The Williamsburg area (including James City County and upper York County) has become a retirement mecca. Money magazine named the region one of the country’s best places to retire. The magazine cited attributes such as the area’s history, culture, green space and access to health care and airports.
The area’s growing reputation among retirees has been helped by a constellation of attractions including the Colonial Williamsburg living history museum, the College of William & Mary, award-winning golf courses, a handful of prestigious gated communities, close access to tidal rivers and the ocean, and a location only three hours away from Washington, D.C.

As the retirement-age population grows, older residents are redefining the options available for their golden years and, in the process, reshaping the community. Kingsmill on the James, opened in the 1970s as the region’s first gated community, now has the company of several other retiree-friendly residential areas protected by gates or private security forces. These include Ford’s Colony and The Governor’s Land at Two Rivers.

Williamsburg Va real estate search

Williamsburg Va real estate search

 Two recent arrivals, Colonial Heritage and The Settlement at Powhattan Creek in James City, requires that residents be 55 or older.

A boom in mixed-used developments also appeals to the preferences of an older population. These projects group shopping, restaurants and low-maintenance residences such as condos and town houses in one location. “Folks are looking more and more at access to retail and entertainment within walking distance of their homes,” says James R. Golden, associate vice president for economic development at William & Mary. “The retirement community is sort of a leader in this.”

Golden helped promote the development of New Town, a mixed-use community just outside Williamsburg. Now a second, similar development, High Street, is under construction in the city. Riverside Health System also has proposed a mixed-use community, Quarterpath at Williamsburg, which would include a hospital, a nursing home and housing. State approval has not yet been granted for the hospital, which would be the Williamsburg area’s second.

Community leaders see the retirement boom as a largely positive economic force that may create jobs for younger folks in areas such as health care, retail and other services. The officials point out that many of those retiring to Williamsburg from other areas, especially the Northeast, are well-heeled professionals and business executives who have chosen to end their careers while still in their 50s. “When you develop a vibrant retirement community … they will pay for services that they want and appreciate, and that will open up opportunities for people that want to fill those needs,” says Richard Schreiber, president and CEO of the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance.

One side effect of becoming a retirement mecca is that land and housing prices in the region have risen to levels beyond the means of many workers in service jobs. “It’s sort of creat­ing a greater shortage of affordable housing,” says Rick Hanson, James City’s director of housing and community development. “A lot of people that work in James City do find the housing costs prohibitive, and they will commute in.”

The cost of housing can also be a problem for some retirees who spent their working years in the community. But local governments are trying to solve the problem. Hanson’s office recently assembled a parcel for development of low-rent senior housing in cooperation with a local nonprofit organization. He says the county also has commissioned a consultant to analyze housing needs and report this fall.

Numbers help tell the story of Williamsburg’s growing popularity as a place to retire. William & Mary and the Center for Excellence in Aging and Geriatric Health, a local organization created to promote the health of older people, reported in 2003 that the 60-and-older population in Williamsburg, James City and upper York grew more than 65 percent, from 5,688 to 10,686, between 1990 and 2000. The 60-and-over population in Virginia as a whole grew 17.1 percent in the same period. Growth in the same group nationwide was 9.4 percent, according to the study, which was based on U.S. Census figures. During this same period, the area’s overall population grew about 27 percent, from 54,980 to 69,763.

Pete Williamson says he retired in Williamsburg partly because the city and its surroundings seem just as full of families and younger people as folks of his generation. Even his affluent Governor’s Land neighborhood seems to be attracting a good number of families, he says. “We have a community with a mix of young and old with school kids and retirees,” Williamson says. “We’re not some retirement community out in the middle of nowhere where you have to drive a half hour just to go to a grocery store.”

Williamson was living in Wilton, Conn., and working as an IBM program manager when he retired in 1994 at the age of 54. A volunteer job with an ambulance corps became full-time work before he and his wife moved to Williamsburg in 1998.

Now 67, Williamson co-leads a 40- to-60-mile bicycle ride for the local bike club ( Williamsburg Area Bicyclists) once or twice a week. He also serves on the board of his neighborhood’s homeowners association and does computer work as a member of a charity tennis group that raised about $45,000 last year for a local hospice.

It’s hard to pinpoint the exact size of the region’s retirement community because there’s no set age for retirement. Louis Rossiter, a former Virginia secretary of health and human resources who’s now director of community health service research for the Center for Excellence in Aging and Geriatric Health, says Williamsburg may serve as a model in developing programs that can be adopted elsewhere.

Thinking ahead is important, says Rossiter, because an older population brings potential problems along with benefits. “When the retirees move here, they’re in good health. Then they age in place,” he says. “Who will take care of them as they become more frail?”

The Center for Excellence is a consortium of colleges, hospitals and health agencies that conducts sponsored research into such subjects as Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis, and studies ways to improve access to medical care. More significant for local retirees, the center also offers geriatric services not generally available in the community, such as memory assessment and driving evaluation.

For high-ranking military retirees, Williamsburg offers something beyond resort communities and golf courses: easy access to Washington. “Lot’s of people continue some kind of consulting but don’t want to live in D.C. — they’ve had that experience,” says William & Mary’s Golden, himself a retired Army brigadier general.

Local organizations increasingly are coming up with ways to capture the interests of these retirees and take advantage of their skills. The Mason School of Business at William & Mary, for example, enlists 90 retirees in its Executive Partners program as mentors for students and faculty and as consultants to companies looking for advice. “The joke is they come, play golf six months and get bored,” says Jonathan Palmer, the school’s associate dean. “We engage them at a very high and active level.”

In addition to mentoring others, Williamsburg retirees are interested in learning something new. William & Mary’s Christopher Wren Association, an education program for retirees, attracted more than 1,400 students last semester to more than 60 classes. Retirees served as faculty for many of the classes.

The Chamber & Tourism Alliance last year began a Community Leadership Service in which 16 retirees who moved to the community recently took a crash course about the region, its governmental structure and inner workings. Participants now are creating a database of retired people with skills that could benefit local nonprofit organizations, says Schreiber, the chamber president.

Leading the database project is Joan Peterson, who was recruited because she chaired the education committee of the Williamsburg Symphonia, a professional chamber orchestra. Peterson moved to Williamsburg from Massachusetts when her husband took early retirement from Hewlett-Packard. She had been director of summer programs for a private school. Now a bit more than four years later, her husband is commuting regularly to consulting jobs in Minneapolis and Seattle, and she is immersed in a project she hopes will benefit nonprofits and retirees. “I absolutely love Williamsburg,” says Peterson. “I would have a hard time coming up with things I don’t like about it. Except maybe for the rapid growth. Everyone wants to be the last one in, I guess.”

 

 

For further information about moving or retiring  in the Williamsburg VA area, golf course homes,  real estate , homes, communities, developments, neighborhoods or building lots in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, Gloucester or York County Virginia  contact:John Womeldorf/ REALTOR

 

Liz Moore & Associates 757 254 8136

John@MrWilliamsburg.com  email

www.MrWilliamsburg.com/  Williamsburg VA Real Estate website

www.MrBurg.com Williamsburg Va Real Estate website  

www.MrHamptonroads.com/  Hampton Roads Va Real Estate website

www.MrTidewater.com/  Tidewater VA Real Estate website

www.MrVaBeach.com/ Va Beach Va Real Estate website

  

Williamsburg Real Estate Resource. Search for Homes & Land for sale in Williamsburg Virginia & surrounding areas  click here :CLICK HERE WILLIAMSBURG VA MLS HOME SEARCH

  CLICK HERE FOR Real Estate Home Search  Tidewater Hampton Roads Va 

  

My other area Real Estate and Information Blogs for Hampton Roads/ Tidewater/ Williamsburg Virignia and surrounding areas

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog II

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog

Williamsburg Happenings/ Events Blog

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Who will buy Busch Gardens in Williamsburg VA ?

A new report in the British newspaper The Telegraph said Blackstone Capital Partners, the major shareholder of Universal Orlando Resort, is one of the companies looking to buy Busch Entertainment once Anheuser-Busch is purchased by InBev.

Busch Entertainment owns SeaWorld, Aquatica and Discovery Cove in Orlando, as well as Busch Gardens and Adventure Island in Tampa, Busch Gardens/ Williamsburg VA  among other theme parks around the country.

Blackstone is reportedly a U.S. private equity firm that owns 50 percent of Universal Orlando Resort and is also a major shareholder in the company that runs the London Eye, wax museums and other attractions.

Busch Entertainment said they did not know about the report, and could not comment.

 

The likelihood is growing that Anheuser-Busch InBev will sell off Busch Entertainment as a non-core asset needed to help pay back a $7 billion bridge loan due in a year. But who will buy it?

The answer, as with Anheuser-Busch itself, may lie across the Atlantic Ocean.

Suitors based in the U.S. seem unlikely. Six Flags, known to have looked at land in the Historic Triangle years ago, has considerable debt, along with a recent deal to develop theme parks in Dubai.

Ohio-based Cedar Fair Entertainment paid $1.24 billion nearly two years ago to buy five parks from Paramount, including Richmond’s King’s Dominion. It, too, has much debt to pay off.

That leaves Walt Disney, which Williamsburg Planning Commission member Doug Pons and fellow hotelier Chris Canavos promoted in a television interview earlier this week. But Disney typically develops its own parks and resorts rather than buying up existing facilities.

With one near exception.

After the 1994 failure to build Disney’s America in Northern Virginia, Disney execs attempted to buy Knott’s Berry Farm in California, not far from Disneyland. The park’s replica of Independence Hall provided a good backdrop for the Disney concept, which was to tell American history.

The deal fell through, partly because of the logistics of transporting Disneyland guests to Disney’s America. Then the Knott family refused to sell, fearing changes Disney might make to the original park. Ohio-based Cedar Fair Entertainment bought the park two years later.

Rekindling the idea of bringing Disney back to Virginia is the conservative political blog Virginia Virtucon.

Here’s what a blogger identified only as Riley had to say in a post Thursday.

“Obviously, the prospects for this project happening are not completely dead, and reportedly many at Disney still believe this project’s ‘time will come,’” Riley wrote. At Busch Gardens, “you have a location that is already zoned for a theme park, has proven to be very successful in that capacity, and the necessary infrastructure is largely already in place. Furthermore, local businesses and residents support a theme park in this location.”

Pons agrees.

“I am convinced Disney is a viable option,” he said. “If packed properly, they could create an amazing resort here.”

Industry experts, however, think an overseas buyer is more likely.

“There are some deep-pocketed players overseas,” said Paul Ruben, North American editor for the England-based Park World Trade Magazine, in a Tuesday interview with the Associated Press. He echoed analyst predictions that Busch Entertainment could reap between $4 billion and $5 billion.

Ruben named England-based Merlin Entertainment Group and Spain’s Parques Reunidos as possible suitors.

Merlin —Owns more than 50 attractions worldwide, including four in the United States: A Legoland park in California, and Madame Tussauds wax museums in Las Vegas, New York and Washington.

The bulk of Merlin’s holdings are in its 26 Sea Life parks, which it bills as the “No. 1 aquarium brand in the world, and No. 2 visitor attraction brand in Europe.”

It also operates theme parks, including Thorpe Park in England, Heide Park in Germany and Gardaland in Italy. It also owns the famous London Eye ferris wheel.

Most compelling about Merlin, however, is its Alton Towers resort in the United Kingdom, which offers a theme park, two hotels, water park, spa, conference center and golf.

Parques Reunidos —Owns 67 attractions, and boasts itself as the second largest owner of “leisure parks” in Europe. It has a much bigger presence (30 properties) in the United States, and touts its recent expansion in the west. Parques’ Boomer’s and Mountasia brands are small “family entertainment centers” with miniature golf, cart racing and bumper boats, with more than a dozen in California and a handful in southeast states.

It also owns multiple theme parks, though its U.S. parks — Kennywood, Idlewild, Lake Compounce and Story Land —are all older parks in the northeast. Parques owns much larger modern parks in Europe, including one in Belgium, the home of InBev.

For further information about golf course homes,  real estate , homes, communities, developments, neighborhoods or building lots in Williamsburg, James City, New Kent, Gloucester or York County Virginia  contact:

John Womeldorf/ REALTOR

Liz Moore & Associates 757 254 8136

John@MrWilliamsburg.com  email

www.MrWilliamsburg.com/  Williamsburg VA Real Estate website

www.MrBurg.com Williamsburg Va Real Estate website  

www.MrHamptonroads.com/  Hampton Roads Va Real Estate website

www.MrTidewater.com/  Tidewater VA Real Estate website

www.MrVaBeach.com/ Va Beach Va Real Estate website

  

Williamsburg Real Estate Resource. Search for Homes & Land for sale in Williamsburg Virginia & surrounding areas  click here :CLICK HERE WILLIAMSBURG VA MLS HOME SEARCH

  CLICK HERE FOR Real Estate Home Search  Tidewater Hampton Roads Va 

  

My other area Real Estate and Information Blogs for Hampton Roads/ Tidewater/ Williamsburg Virignia and surrounding areas

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog II

Williamsburg Real Estate Blog

Williamsburg Happenings/ Events Blog

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